This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
90: roth and ramberg photography


RAB IS LIKE SOME KIND OF NORTHERN HIGHLANDS MACGYVER


Rab (must be gaelic for half artist, half engineer) makes beautifully crafted Sgian Dubhs (pronounced ‘skin-doos’) – the traditional little knife kilted- Scots wear in the sock. And there is a huge demand for Rab’s version. In fact, he’s working his way through a one-year waiting list.


Rab was nothing sort of a genius. His workshop reminded us of something out of Back to the Future. Originally from the Isle of Jura, he met his wife Tanya at university in Aberdeen. Long story short, they fell in love with each other, and then with a very old farmhouse in a tucked away place called Divach near Drum. For the record, they are very gracious hosts on little to no notice.


Rab credits his creative ingenuity with growing up on a farm in the Isle of Jura. He says that it was simply a necessity of island life. If something broke, you had to learn how to fix it with what you had.


Obviously, Rab was paying attention. One of his inventions, the Sgian Brew, looks just like the real thing but features a handy bottle opener instead of a knife. Needless to say, these are very popular.


Over a hot cup of tea on a cold rainy day, we asked Rab and Tanya what they believed when it came to the monster. Suddenly a hush fell over the house. While they didn’t quite buy in, their six-year-old son Max was a very firm believer. So for Max, who was just down the hall, we decided not to debate the issue in great detail.


We were fortunate to photograph Rab between downpours. Almost.


After countless drams, 12 photographs, and an eight-day tour of Loch Ness, it was time to head back to Edinburgh to begin our journey home.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97