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Oil City Iron Works utilizes matchplate, cope and drag and slinger green sand molding for its short-run, low-volume manufacturing.


required to be an effective leader? “It is the 250-plus families depend-


ing on your decisions,” Meyers Jr. said. “It is a different level of pressure, especially in the midst of the recent economic turmoil.” Te succession was the second


family transition for the Meyers family; the elder Meyers purchased the foundry from his father in 1986 (coincidentally, the firm was mired in financial disarray as the result of a recession at that time, as well).


“We have a good team in place to


ease the transition,” Meyers Sr. said. “It took time to develop the manage- ment team, but now it is mature. Te key was to begin the process 5 to 10 years before the current transition to develop the strong leadership. With that done, I could get out of the way and let them run the organization.” One of the key visions of the man-


agement team along with quality cast- ings is safety and cleanliness. “In order to continually produce quality castings,


you must have a strict safety program in place and keep the facility clean. All of our employees know and appreciate this and it is one of the key factors that keeps us strong.” Meyers Jr. said. Te result is a metalcasting com-


pany that began to rebound from the recession in mid-2010, four to six months before most of the competi- tion. Now the business benefits from a stable management team and a firm belief in its core business of quality and low-run castings.


Tried and True Oil City reports it has more than


10,000 active patterns, with no single customer having more than 25% of the overall business. “We have really found our niche,”


Riley said. “We are a jobbing shop. Tat is what has kept us from being subject to the intense offshore competition.” Te focus on low-volume work


Oil City Iron Works considers its diversity in metals and casting size critical to its future poten- tial for success.


22 | MODERN CASTING August 2011


is evident throughout the plant. Te facility has green sand molding areas for semi-automatic matchplate molding (which typically runs up to 50 20 x 24-in. molds an hour), semi-automatic cope and drag molding up to 24 x 36 in., manual rollover cope and drag molding up to 54 x 54 in., and a sand slinger for loose pattern work up to 92 x 123 in. Oil City also has a semi-au- tomatic nobake loop, as well as a floor molding area for castings up to 8,000


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