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Adolph Teichert, the following paints a picture of a company that is not just integral to the construction of signature projects in its home state, but also to the com- munities that benefit from its longtime commitment to corporate citizenship.


A STONEMASON’S VISION


Adolph Teichert learned stonemasonry from his father as a young man in Nienstedten, Germany. In 1871, he had completed his apprenticeship and immigrated to the United States, where he lived and worked in New York. He was just 17 years old. Four years later, he was hired by the Artificial Stone Co. and moved to San Francisco to super- vise the construction of a new type of concrete pavement.


His responsibility was to build sidewalks for mansions in the city’s Nob Hill neighborhood and pave surfaces around the Mark Hopkins Hotel and Golden Gate Park. Adolph’s name can still be found stamped on concrete walkways. He became a naturalized citizen in 1879, married and had four children, three girls and one boy. In 1887, he decided to start his own business pouring artificial stone for side- walks, garden walks and carriage drives.


When his son, Adolph Teichert Jr., a University of California, Berkeley-educated engineer,


joined the


company in 1912, he changed the name to A. Teichert & Son and expanded the company’s work scope to include


highway construction. In fact, the newly organized State of California Highway Dept. (now the California Dept. of Transportation) awarded the company one of the earliest highway contracts.


In 1922, P.W. Schoeningh joined the firm as the admin- istrative manager—becoming the first of many industry professionals to join the Teichert family. Schoeningh served Teichert for over 50 years in positions such as Executive Vice President, President, and Chairman of the Board.


The company was incorporated in 1927 with Adolph Teichert Sr. as President, Adolph Teichert Jr. as Vice President, and P.W. Schoeningh as Secretary-Treasurer. On August 24, 1929, A. Teichert & Son received the California State Contractors License No. 8.


DEVELOPED FROM WITHIN


Through the years, Teichert has continued to grow its ser- vices and its leadership team.


For instance, the company began producing rock products in 1932 under the trade name of Perkins Gravel Co. (later Teichert Aggregates) and installed the state’s first asphalt paving machine. In 1936, the business added the produc- tion and delivery of ready-mixed concrete, and a second crushing operation in 1939.


A. Teichert & Son mechanics on the job in the 1940s


POWERED BY THE BLUE BOOK NETWORK - SACRAMENTO & CENTRAL VALLEY / FALL 2016


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