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ALLIANCES Countries lacking Web tech and production knowledge need products from the specialists


Brett Brune Editor in Chief


Wahlster: US, Germany must combine strengths


C 48


oopetition—a portmanteau of cooperation and competi- tion—between the US and European nations is essential to make products for export to still other nations that


specialize in neither Web tech nor produc- tion knowledge, Wolfgang Wahlster said in September. He spoke at Industry of Things World 2016, in Berlin. While the world looks up to the US for


the greatest advances in Internet technol- ogy, the US has lost much of the produc- tion knowledge it had years ago, he said in response to a question from Smart Manufac- turing magazine about what level of coope- tition is appropriate between countries working to dominate smart manufacturing. When he visited Tesla, he found most of


the components building the firm’s electric vehicles—the robots and the software—were from Germany, Wahlster, CEO and Scientific


Director of the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence, said in his speech. The Tesla experience is emblematic of a diminished manufacturing industry in the US, he said. Even Ivy League US universities have only a handful of professors for manu- facturing, he said in a follow-up interview with Smart Manufacturing. Coopetition is very important, Wahlster added, “because we need cooperation espe- cially with the United States and China con- cerning the equipment for Industrie 4.0. The basic layer of the Industrial Internet is well understood especially in the States, which is the Internet country. On the other hand, we need for Industrie 4.0 all of the manufactur- ing knowledge and software platforms for advanced manufacturing.” During the time production muscle atro- phied in the US, “it was improved in Europe, especially in Germany,” he said. “So we have to combine these two ingredients to really


Wolfgang Wahlster, one of the founding fathers of Industrie 4.0, gave people attending a recent industry conference in Berlin a detailed explanation of where the German “future project” came from and where it is going.


Fall 2016


Photo by Janek Stroisch for You.Conect


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