This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
// OLYMPIC FLASHBACK: 2002 WINTER OLYMPIC GAMES All


About Family


2002 Olympic Winter Games: Where are they now?


Liapis sisters still cheering for USA and staying in touch with sport their family fell in love with growing up in Bemidji


Editor’s note: Tis is part one in a series of feature stories featuring our


past Olympic teams in preparation for the 2018 Olympic Winter Games. By Brad Whitlock, U.S. Curling News writer


W 12 usacurl.org ))


hen Stacey Liapis returned from participating in the 1998 Olympics with the USA women’s curling team, she gave herself two immediate goals:


1) Return to the Olympics in 2002, and 2) Have her sister, Kari, on the team with her You see, Kari Erickson had made the decision not to pursue the 1998


Olympics to care for her first-born child. But Stacey wasn’t having any of that for the next Olympics. Having


lived the thrill of the Olympics at Nagano, Japan, she knew she wanted her sister, Kari, to share the experience. “If I was going to go again it was


going to be with Kari,” remembers Stacey. So, she started lobbying her sister. As Kari tells it 14 years later with a smile, “Stacey was very, very persuasive.” As a result, both Liapis sisters represented the U.S. at Salt Lake City,


Utah, in 2002, with Kari skipping the team all the way to the bronze-medal match game against Canada. Te U.S. would finish fourth but remain the only American ladies team to reach the playoffs at an Olympic Games. Te Liapis sisters remember their Olympic experiences as the thrill of a


lifetime. Trying to compare going to two Olympics, Stacey puts it simply,;“It was a shocker to be able to go twice. I wanted it to happen. I hoped it would happen. It was amazing and overwhelming when it actually did happen


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46