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NEWS DESK


Dornfeld was born in Horicon, WI, in 1949. He at- tended the University of Wisconsin at Madison and studied mechanical engineering. After graduating with a PhD in 1976, he began teaching in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at UC Berkeley in 1977. He acted as depart- ment chair from 2010–2015. After serving as one of two interim faculty co-directors, Dornfeld was appointed faculty director of the Jacobs Institute for Design Innovation, which aims to provide a space for students interested in technol- ogy and design. Dornfeld was a fellow and past director of SME, and a member since 1971. He also was a founder of NAMRC, the conference hosted by the North American Manufacturing Research Institution of SME (NAMRI/SME). Dornfeld was recognized by SME with the Outstanding


Young Manufacturing Engineer Award in 1982, the Frederick W. Taylor Research Medal in 2004, the NAMRI/SME Out- standing Lifetime Service Award in 2013, and the M. Eugene Merchant Manufacturing Medal of ASME/SME in 2015.


3D Systems Names New CEO 3


D Systems Corp. named former HP Inc. executive Vyomesh Joshi as presi- dent and chief executive officer. Joshi worked at HP from 1980 to 2012,


most recently as executive vice president of the company’s imaging and printing group.


His hiring ended a search that began after the exit of CEO Avi Reichental in October. Joshi comes aboard as 3D Systems (Rock Hill, SC) is trying to shift its emphasis away from the consumer printer market and toward industrial printers. 3D Systems last year posted a loss of $655.5 million. “It is clear that we need to develop new and innovative


products with unprecedented quality and service levels to drive sustainable growth and profits,” Joshi said in a state- ment. Andrew Johnson, who had been interim CEO since Reichental’s departure, will remain with 3D Systems as execu- tive vice president and chief legal officer.


Redefi ne your design


Explore the potential of additive manufacturing


Renishaw’s additive manufacturing systems use powder bed fusion technology to produce fully dense complex metal parts direct from 3D CAD.


Also known as 3D printing, this technology is not constrained by traditional manufacturing design rules. Create complex geometries such as conformal cooling channels for


tooling inserts, reduce component weight by only placing material where it is needed, and consolidate multiple parts in one assembly. Additive manufacturing is also complementary to conventional machining technologies, and directly contributes to reduced lead times, tooling costs and


material waste.  No requirement for tooling.


 Increased design freedom—complex geometries and hidden features.


 Rapid design iterations right up to manufacture.


Renishaw.com/additive


Renishaw Inc Hoffman Estates, IL www.renishaw.com


18 AdvancedManufacturing.org | May 2016


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