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optic, we’re taking two complex movable optics that can get damaged out of the beam path.” Meanwhile, the entry-level Platino remains


Prima’s fl agship machine, offering various cutting routines at 2 to 6 kW.


Salvagnini The company’s L3 line comes in the L3-30, L3-40 and L3-4020 variants, refl ecting table sizes of 3 m × 60", 4 m × 60 ", and 4 m × 80", respectively. The L5 series, which features a single-optic head cooled without gas, comes in the two smaller table sizes only. Both lines are available in 2 to 4 kW.


TRUMPF The TruLaser 1030 fi ber machine is a low-cost, compact, and operator friendly machine, Stanczyc noted. “It is the ideal entry-level machine,” avail- able in 2 or 3 kW and a 120 × 60" working area. The TruLaser 2030 fi ber “combines the advantages of a compact machine with the performance of a higher machine class” thanks to a dual guided-motion unit. It is available at 3 kW or 4 kW with the same table size as the 1030 fi ber. The TruLaser 3030/3040 fi ber adds AdjustLine and CoolLine features to process lower-quality material. “The processing of brass, copper, titanium and even tube profi les with the help of RotoLas provide maximum fl exibility,” Stancyzc said. Finally, the Drop&Cut func- tion allows quicker response to changing materials. The system comes in 3, 4 or 6k W and 120 × 60 work area. At the top end, the TruLaser 5030/5040 fi ber “is the most cost-effective solution for highly produc- tive, universal processing. In particular, with complex contours and thin sheets, it sets itself apart from the TruLaser 3030/3040 fi ber due to increased dynamics.” Options such as BrightLine fi ber, CoolLine “permit reproducible, high part quality combined with low operator presence and minimum non-productive times.” It comes in 6 and 8-kW powers, with a 120 × 6" work area. A key enhancement for the company’s


Salvagnini L5 patented compass drive positioner and cutting head. Photo courtesy Salvagnini


The turnkey system includes the height-sensing


laser, automatic focus, shuttle table, chiller, feed and extraction equipment and can be expanded into automation, Aleshin said. “They come with a rather complete set of cut tables for a number of different materials and thicknesses. What we typically do is lock those in when our site engineers are done with installation testing. A couple hundred cutting parameters can be held for materials and multiple thicknesses of those materials.“


TruLaser fi ber machines is BrightLine fi ber, an optional feature on TRUMPF’s mid- to high- end machines. BrightLine fi ber allows higher cut and part quality, the best piercing quality, minimal contour sizes, high process stability, and easier part removal, Stanczyc explained. The feature lets customers cut stainless steel


up to 1.5" thick and aluminum and mild steel up to 1" thick. The option “greatly reduces burr formation and increases edge quality and speed, leading to more productivity and fewer processes after cutting. It allows customers to turn raw material into fi nished products in less time.”


Geoff Giordano is former director of communica- tions for the Laser Institute of America and a lifelong journalist. Follow him on Twitter at @GeoffGiordano


AdvancedManufacturing.org LF17


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