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Openings / New Jersey Open


alternative for White would then be, after 4. ... c6 5. d5, which the book covers. It’s a rough and tumble game in any event.


1. d4 e6 2. c4 f5 3. g3 Nf6 4. Bg2 d5 5. Nh3


A time-honored way of meeting


the Stone wall Dutch. The idea is to have the knight go to f4 and d3 while the other horse goes to d2 and f3 with a lock on e5.


5. ... c6


Houdini gives the not very intuitive 5. ... dxc4 6. 0-0 Nc6 7. e3 Be7 as equal.


6. Qc2 Bd6 7. Bf4 Be7 Black can castle instead and get


one more move of evidence from White. I used to wonder why Botvinnik played his ... Be7 right away. Now I know. Saves a tempo. Let’s be clear, though. It’s not the end of the world if Black exchanges bishops: 7. ... Bxf4 8. Nxf4 Ne4 9. Nc3 0-0 10. 0-0 Qf6 11. e3 Nd7 and White has a pull. He can consider op erations on the c- and b-files or he can try for an f2-f3 and e2-e4 pawn push at some point. Black can either try to play defense to these plans or try for a typical Dutch attack with ... g7-g5, getting the other knight to f6 and getting his rooks over to the f- and g-files. That may work against a weaker opponent who is more easily distracted by aggressive kingside displays.


8. Nd2 0-0 9. 0-0 Bd7 More than a few Dutch players


are investigating ... b7-b6 and ... Bb7 or ... Ba6 as the spot for the bishop as it is dead on d7. Also, since White wants to give up the


At A Glance ⁄2 Aaron Shlionsky; Top Age 55 & Over, 4: Boris Privman; Under 2000, 1st-4th, 5: Nico Werner Chasin, Jan Paragua, Vedant Rautela, Angelica Chin; 5th, 41 ⁄2


: Sean Cushman; Top Under Age 13, 4: Evelyn Zhu; Top Under Age 16, 31 : Tim Kraft; 2nd-3rd, 5: Suraj Oruganti, Albert Yao; 4th-5th, 41 ⁄2


⁄2 ⁄2 : Sean Winston Luo; Top Class F, 3: Aryan Jhaveri; Top Under Age 13, 31 ⁄2 : Maxwell Weinstein; Top Age 55 & Over, 21 ⁄2 ⁄2


: Alexander Stripunsky, Mackenzie Molner, Arun Prasad Subramanian, Sergey Kudrin, Joel Benjamin, Alex : Sergei Malinin; Top Class A, 4: Maanav Ganthapodi; Top Under Age 13, 4: Brandon Jacobson; Top Under Age 16, 4: ⁄2


⁄2 :


Robert Forney; Top Class B, 4: David Liu, Amey Pasarkar, Ankit Raparthi, Jessica Rattray, Shawn Wang, Mitch Fishbein, Charles Hua, Samuel Zhang, Claire Cao; Top Class C, 31 1600, 1st, 51 Top Class E, 31


: Donnally Miller; Under


: Sumer Maini, Dhruv Patel; Top Class D, 4: Jun Kubo, Eric Yuhan Li, Harpal Maini; ⁄2


: Katie Lin; Top Under Age 16, 21 Brian Cige. | Chief Tournament Director: Noreen Davisson. www.uschess.org 31 : Jaron Bernard; Top Age 55 & Over, 31 ⁄2 : Rather tepid for the grandmaster.


10. Rac1 looked more lively. 10. ... h6


If Black tries to free himself with


10. ... c5 then this should discourage him: 11. cxd5 Nxd5 12. dxc5 Na6 13. Ne5 Nxc5 14. Rfd1 and compare the white bishops and rooks with the black bishops and rook “oppor - tunities” and you will see why White’s position is superior.


11. Bxb8 Rxb8 12. Nf4 Ne4 He might have done better


bringing the Stonewall bishop back to d6: 12. ... Bd6 13. Ne5 Bxe5 14. dxe5 Ne4 15. Rac1 (15. Rfd1 b5) 15. ... g5.


13. Ng6 Rf6 14. Nfe5 Be8 15. Nxe7+ Qxe7 16. c5 Ng5 17. f4 Nf7


Black has fought a very


admirable defense. He’s still at a disadvantage, but his position is defensible. Dutch players are tough nuts to crack!


18. Nd3 g5 19. e3 g4 20. h4


Grandmaster Coach versus FIDE Master Student: Choosing an Opening


John Burke has attracted much


attention for his international mas - ter performance at the World Open followed by an international master perfor mance at a Marshall Chess Club tourna ment. His last round opponent was former U.S. Cham - pion Joel Benjamin—his chess coach. There is a tale here based on a discussion I heard Joel have with John after the game. I asked him to repeat it:


“I am fortunate to work with so


many supremely talented New Jersey youths, but it’s less fun when they get strong enough to challenge me in tournaments. The awkward part is not so much that they might beat me. For a teacher- student relationship to work, the student has to be honest about his areas of weakness and lack of knowledge, not to mention show the openings of all his games. So I tread lightly in preparing openings , avoiding us ing privileged information. It all goes


bishop for the knight that would challenge the dark squares, this little dance might be worth a try: 9. ... Nbd7 10. Ng5 Nb8 11. e3 Nh5 12. Ngf3 Nd7 13. Rac1 g5 14. Be5 g4 15. Ne1.


10. Nf3


gxh3 e.p. 21. Bf3 It’s not clear what’s wrong with


21. Bxh3.


21. ... Rg6 22. Qh2 Kh7 23. Kf2 Rg7 24. Qxh3 Qf6 25. Rh1 The final irony. White gets the decisive kingside attack.


25. ... b5 26. b3 Bd7 27. Ne5 Be8 28. Bh5 bxc5 29. Bxf7 Rxf7 30. Nxf7, Black resigned.


back to my own teenage years when I had to play my coach, Sal Matera. Sal didn’t want to take advantage of his position; one game he even played 1. g3, just to avoid openings we had discussed. After the game I explained to John that I tried to get a good position while still being fair in my opening choice, as my teacher had done with me. As it turned out, my opening was a good one, and put him in an uncomfortable situation. After John resigned, I told him there were still some things I could teach him. It was said with a bit of relief that I was still useful. Soon JMB will figure out how good he is and we will all be in trouble.”


QUEEN’S PAWN


OPENING (D00) GM Joel Benjamin (2627) FM John Burke (2456) New Jersey Open 2015, Open Section (6), Morristown, New Jersey, 09.07.2015


1. d4 Nf6 2. Bg5 d5 3. e3 g6 4. Bxf6 exf6 5. g3 c6 6. Bg2 Qb6 7. b3 Bg7 8. Ne2 0-0 9. 0-0 Be6 10. Nd2 Nd7 11. c4 Qa5 12. Qc2 f5 13. Rfc1 Nf6 14. Nf4 Rfd8 15. Rab1 c5? 16. cxd5 Nxd5 17. Nxd5 Bxd5 18. Qxc5 Qxd2 19. Bxd5 Qxa2 20. Ra1 Qd2 21. Bxb7 Rab8 22. Bd5 Qb4 23. Rxa7 Qd2 24. Qc3 Qe2 25. Qc7, Black resigned.


Thus ends our look inside a not-


so-typical weekend Swiss. The grandmasters and amateurs all picked openings that led to a fierce fight. They weren’t so much wor - ried about the latest move. They looked for positions that would allow them to try for a win— regardless of the opponent.


New Jersey Open 2015


Date: September 5-7, 2015 | Location: Headquarters Plaza Hyatt, Morristown, New Jersey | 174 players, 3 sections | Top Finishers: Open, 1st-2nd, 5: Magesh Panchanathan, Sergei Azarov; 3rd-9th, 41 Fishbein, John Fedorowicz; Top Expert, 31


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