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14. Rd3 allows Black’s counterattack to


proceed unhindered. Walter Korn, in Modern Chess Openings-12 [MCO—L.A.] gives 14. Qc5 Qb7 15. Qa3 Bf5 16. Ba6 Qc7 17. Qc5 Qb6 18. Qxb6 axb6 19. Bc4 Rfc8 20. Bb3 Rxa2! with equal chances. Modern theory agrees. And, of course, 14. Rd3


is a very serious blunder; this is not a position in which to lose tempi!


14. ... Bf5 15. Rd2 Rab8


20. Ke2 Re1+ The rook is now next to the white king, and thus


requires protection. And what for? Stronger was an immediate 20. ... Bxc2, keeping the option of a future ... Re1+ in reserve.


21. Kf2 Bxc2 22. Bd4 This loses instantly. I don’t see a quick win for


Black after 22. Bxa7, with a threat of Rd5-c5 (exploiting the vulnerable position of Black’s e1- rook, as noted above).


22. ... Rd1 Pinning the second bishop, as well. 23. Ke3 e5!


Back to Basics / Reader annotations This 5-0 result raised my rating a whopping


102 points, and my modest cash winnings were enough to purchase my first chess clock! All in all, it was a very enjoyable weekend in my state’s capital with my wife and young daughter. On a side note, I had never played a tournament with such long time controls (maybe 40 in 2 hours, not sure), so during the fourth round, in the middle of a Stonewall Attack (the opening recommended in Horowitz and Reinfeld’s book) I made my move, punched my clock, then scurried out of the Civic Center to take my young family to the Sunday morning church services nearby. When I returned, I still had enough time on my clock to grind out a win for White in 59 moves. But that game is another story for another time. Thanks, Lev, for inspiring me to share this game with your readers. In reality, I am just happy to preserve the game for my four young grandsons. This game shows that a B-player can, and in


16. Qc5 16. Qc5 comes two moves too late. Now


Black gets the pawn back, plus a devastating attack!


If 16. c3, Qxc3+ (or 16. ... Bxc3) and Black wins. 16. ... Bxb2+ 17. Kd1 Qxc5


Now Black is happy to remove White’s best defender. 18. Bxc5 Bc3


Opening up the back rank for the rook, while


removing the c-pawn’s defender. White’s king looks very vulnerable.


19. Rd5 Forcing the loss of material.


24. Bxe5 Rxd5 25. Bxc3 Rd1 Reestablishing the pin on the hapless bishop!


26. Kf2 White could defend more stubbornly with 26. g3


(to be able to play Bf1-g2) or 26. a3 (to close the b- file, if needed, with Bc3-b4). Still, Black should win without any serious problems.


26. ... Rb8 Activating the final piece!


27. Be1


some cases should, know his opening theory beyond the first dozen moves. White’s tempo-losing blunder on move 14 was skillfully exploited by Charles, and while I disagreed with some of his later choices (moves 19 and 20) Black’s big, perhaps even decisive, advantage was never in question. And indeed, pins stood up to their reputation. The entire story is very good and very uplifting.


Does this column’s title sound familar? Long-time readers might remember that we used “The Pin Is Mightier Than The Sword” in our September 1994 issue as part of an article about chess pin collecting..


Send in your games!


If you are unrated or rated 1799 or be - low, then GM Lev Alburt invites you to send your most instructive game with notes to:


Back to Basics, c/o Chess Life PO Box 3967 Crossville, TN 38557-3967


Or e-mail your material to backtobasics@uschess.org


19. ... Rb1+ The pin that follows on the king’s bishop


takes it and the king’s rook permanently out of the action! Black’s task has now become a lot easier! On move 17, Charles told about removing the


white king’s best defender, the queen. Now I’d like to play 19. ... Rfd8 to exchange White’s only active rook. In other words: exchange a pair of rooks; pin on the first rank with a remaining rook.


27. ... Rb2 An excellent move—and the final blow. 28. Be2 Finally moving the king’s bishop.


28. … Bd3!, White resigned. The final pin!


GM Alburt will select the “most in struc - tive” game and Chess Life will award an autographed copy of Lev’s newest book, Platonov’s Chess Academy (by Lev Alburt and Sam Palatnik) to the person submitting the most in structive game and annotations.


Make sure your game (or part of it) and your notes will be of interest to other readers. Writing skills are a plus, but instructiveness is a must! Do not send games with only a few notes, as they are of little instructive value and can’t be used.


www.ChessWithLev.com


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