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TRICARE IMPLEMENTED AN URGENT CARE PILOT PROGRAM in late May allowing beneficiaries to access urgent care facilities without preauthoriza- tion from a primary care manager (PCM). Under the three-year pilot program, each enrollee can visit urgent care two times each fiscal year. The Urgent Care Pilot Program is available to:  TRICARE Prime enrollees (except active duty


servicemembers);  TRICARE Prime Remote enrollees (including


active duty servicemembers);  TRICARE Young Adult-Prime enrollees; and  TRICARE Prime Overseas and TRICARE Prime


Remote Overseas enrollees — but only when trav- eling stateside. The Urgent Care Pilot Program is not available to:


 active duty servicemembers with TRICARE Prime;  activated Guard/Reserve members enrolled in


TRICARE Prime;  beneficiaries enrolled in the U.S. Family Health


Plan; or  beneficiaries enrolled overseas. For additional information, visit www.tricare.mil/


urgentcarepilot or speak with a MOAA member ser- vice representative by calling MOAA’s Member Ser- vice Center at (800) 234-MOAA (6622).


In Review


The Queen’s American Rangers. By Donald J. Gara. Westholme Publishing, 2015. $29.95. ISBN 978-1-594- 16225-1.


The Ameri- can Revolu- tion can be considered a civil war, especially when so


many loyalists fought along- side the British army. The Queen’s American Rangers are the most famous of the loyalist units, fi ghting in bloody campaigns in Penn- sylvania, New York, and New Jersey from 1776-81. Historian Donald Gara


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tells the rangers’ fascinating story as a skilled fi ghting regiment of infantry and mounted hussars. Origi- nally formed in 1776 by Maj. Robert Rogers, a hero of the French and Indian War, and later commanded by Lt. Col. John Graves Simcoe, the rangers were trained and employed as light infantry and cavalry and “expected to display more initiative and independence than regular British troops.” Under Simcoe’s aggres-


sive, imaginative leader- ship, the rangers were adept at scouting, raiding, and close combat, relying on speed, mobility, surprise, and the bayonet. This is an excellent, well-told history


22 MILITARY OFFICER JUNE 2016


of an obscure American loyalist fi ghting outfi t.


A Noble Cause: American Battlefield Victories In Vietnam. By Douglas Niles. Berkley Caliber, 2015. $26.95. ISBN 978-0-425-27834-5.


As a fi tting counter- point to the Vietnam War’s de- featists and apologists,


Douglas Niles’ thoughtful book highlights the war’s numerous American battle- fi eld victories, praising American servicemembers for their steadfast courage, skill, and sacrifi ce in a po- litically unwinnable war. Niles’ crisp battlefi eld


narrative focuses on the successful combat actions of platoons, companies, and battalions to large set- piece triumphs involving regiments and divisions fi ghting in jungles, moun- tains, and cities against experienced, well-led Viet- cong and North Vietnam- ese army units. He vividly describes the planning, intelligence, logistics, fi re support, com- mand and control, tactics, actions, and outcomes of iconic battles, as well as equally important small unit ambushes, meeting en- gagements, and fi erce close combat in bloody places. — William Bushnell


PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK


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