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need to know


60 Seconds with a CEO…


ONE-ON-ONE TIME WITH AN ARGENTUM MEMBER CHIEF EXEC


Eric Mendelsohn, President & CEO of National Health Investors Inc.


How did you wind up in the senior living arena? I was recruited by Emeritus Senior Living as director of real estate and legal affairs in 2006. At the time, I was work- ing for the University of Washington doing lab space and medical office building deals. I’ve been in this business ever since!


How is NHI different than other finance/real estate companies in this space? We are a niche player. We focus on smaller, local operators who are less likely to have a national pres- ence. We are also very flat organizationally, meaning that you can get a decision quickly.


What inspires you every day? I would have to say the thrill of the deal and get- ting things done inspires me. I get an extraordinary amount of job satisfaction by getting things done.


What do you do in your downtime? In the little amount of downtime I have, I love to practice the guitar and I also enjoy trying out new recipes from my cookbook collection. Both of my parents are still alive and live in Pennsylvania. I have a sister and four nieces and nephews I enjoy spend- ing time with.


What’s the last book you read? The last book I read was The Corner Office by Adam Bryant. The book contains interviews and observa- tions of CEOs. I love books like this; reading them is a great way to get perspective.


Favorite sports team? The Seattle Seahawks, hands down. I recently moved to Nashville from Seattle, but still love to root for the Seahawks. They were an underdog team for so long, it’s hard to give up on them.


—Angela Hickman


Julien Xuereb


Artist-in-Residence Program Brings Professional Entertainment to


Senior Living Community Along with higher-end amenities, residents and their fami- lies are showing an increased appetite for quality enter- tainment. Springwell Senior Living has taken the concept of artist-in-residence and put a literal spin on it. A 26-year- old classical guitarist is the newest resident at Springwell in Baltimore. A graduate student at the Peabody Institute, Julien


Xuereb enjoys complimentary accommodations in exchange for the provision of ongoing entertainment and interaction with community residents. Xuereb plays guitar on a daily basis in areas that are open to residents and guests, offers private performances for two residents per week in their rooms, performs at weekly happy hours, and participates in a more formal monthly performance, often in collaboration with other entertainers. “Our residents are gaining tremendous personal enjoy-


ment by listening to him play guitar, and also by building personal relationships with him,” says Phil Golden, Spring- well’s director. “His music is bringing a lot of joy to a lot of people.” The residence established a partnership with the Pea-


body Institute in June 2015 to create a program based on the concept of “community connectivity.” As Peabody stu- dents train to be top-level professional performers, they are also encouraged to find and develop new audiences, sharing their musical gifts in ways that are meaningful to their communities. “Studies support the positive effects of music in


improving visual and verbal skills, maintaining memory and mental acuity, improving sleep quality, boosting the immune system, reducing pain and surgical recovery time, normalizing blood pressure and pulse, reducing stress, mitigating depression and anxiety, and elevating mood,” adds Robin Power, a nurse practitioner and psychiatric consultant for Springwell.


6 SENIOR LIVING EXECUTIVE | NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015 | WWW.ARGENTUM.ORG


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