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Spring 2017


“Coming to work every day, you know who you’re going to be around and you know you can trust them,” Officer Corey Newcomb says in the video. “You’re not just trusting someone as a law enforcement officer on duty. They’re your friends.”


At the Crestview Police Department, more than 4 out of 5 applicants are washed out before they even start. Really, does strong academic performance matter that much? So what if a “youthful indiscretion” or two landed an applicant in hot water. A few puffs on a joint or a couple pills last month surely isn’t all that bad, right? Wrong. At a time when police officers are being targeted by everyone from snipers to zealous col- umnists, Crestview residents—and fellow cops—expect more from Crestview’s officers than ever before, Tay- lor said. “The state standards are a minimum,” Schneider, who oversees the agency’s training programs, said. “We exceed them.”


For example, the state of Florida requires officers to prove firearms proficiency every two years. Crestview Police Department requires its officers to recertify twice a year, and is considering raising that standard, Schneider said. Why? “How about Baton Rouge and Dallas?” Chief Taylor said, citing places where cops have been ambushed or attacked by armed snipers. Monthly drills and classroom instruction, physical fitness standards and regular professional training, coupled with the Crestview City Council’s recent allocation of almost 30 acres for a public safety firing range and training center, help maintain the agency’s expectations.


When the Crestview Police De- partment applicants graduate Looper’s or other state- accredited academies and pass the stringent background test— which exceeds state mandates— they’ll be ready for a two-week orientation. If they pass that, they will begin the Police De- partment’s own intensive 10-12- week field training process as full-fledged police officers— Crestview’s “cops who care.”


“It’s an honorable profession,” Director Looper said. “It’s been around more than a thousand years.”


Cops Who Care The Crestview Police Department’s new recruitment campaign focuses on the agency’s service to the com- munity and its tight-knit, family-like atmosphere. Campaign collateral includes:


A series of nine posters depicting actual local police officers in actual situations, as well as training sessions. A new tri-fold recruitment brochure. A 5-minute recruitment video featuring unscripted commentary by Crestview Police officers and footage of actual police responses. A table-top display for recruitment and job fairs. Print advertisements.


Applicants who want to be part of an agency composed of dedicated professionals with standards and expectations higher than most other law enforcement agencies, accredited by the Florida Law Enforcement Accreditation Commission, may contact Commander Andrew Schneider at 850.682.3544.


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