search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
Spring 2017


The Florida Police Chiefs Association Statewide Disaster Task Force By Chief Peter Paulding, Gulf Breeze P.D./Retired


The basis of our ability to field an effective force statewide is the participation of agencies of all sizes contrib- uting resources to field a large emergency response force. Agencies contribute workforce and equipment that they are able to spare from their daily operations. The personnel respond for approximately a week at a time and then return to their home agency as they are replaced at the disaster scene. A command structure, food, housing, communications and all equipment needed goes with the force. It is self-contained and able to as- sume duties immediately upon arrival. It renders aid for as long as needed. It is coordinated and effective. It works because all participants are invested in staffing it and maintaining it. The Task Force is mission driven.


Background and Rationale Florida was hit by significant hurricanes in 2004 and 2005. Hurricanes Katrina and Rita also struck the Gulf Coast in 2005. The events caused dramatic and extensive property damage and loss of life. In spite of the planning and preparations over prior years, police chiefs in Florida noted in the aftermath of Hurricane Wilma at the end of 2005 that they did not receive the help they needed. The Florida Police Chiefs Association evaluated the response that was being implemented in the wake of the disasters and decided that we needed to do a better job of responding to disasters and providing immediate assistance where needed. We felt that a more directed and coordinated re- sponse was needed and that more resources needed to be made available. We began seeking a ‘best prac- tice’ model that could form the basis of our Disaster Task Force. The Orange County Police Chiefs had imple- mented a successful plan based upon the Florida Sheriffs Association model. By adapting the sheriffs’ model to the police department structure in the state, a coordinated and long-term response could be achieved. The Task Force is the voluntary participation of each agency in each FPCA District providing both personnel and equipment sufficient to field a self-contained team for an indefinite period of time.


When disaster strikes and the need for assistance is greatest, the Task Force can respond within 24 hours no- tice and can provide extensive assistance to the requesting agency. It is organized with its own command structure, communications, housing, food and equipment to perform any law enforcement task. Each partici- pating agency commits the personnel and equipment it can. The normal numbers committed are 3% to 5% of staffing strength of each agency. The number of personnel each department commits is comparable to the numbers that are normally allowed off duty at one time for vacations or compensatory time off. This level of commitment usually does not effect the daily operations of the agencies and allows for participation for ex- tended periods of time. Officers are cycled in and out of a disaster area in 7 day periods, yet the response re- mains active and on-going for as long as necessary. Some small agencies commit as few as one officer, while larger agencies can commit many more. Some small agencies can only provide the officer with his duty gear; other larger agencies can supply mobile command posts and other substantial resources they may possess. By utilizing this format, each region can provide task forces of approximately 30 officers and all the necessary equipment to support their activities in the field. This approach can allow us to generate a statewide task force of over 500 officers and becomes a significant supplement to the state disaster plan, augmenting it by a large margin.


Continued on next page


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36