search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
‘Any of you chaps got experience on the Oxford?’


‘I’ve got a bit more than 800 hours on them.’ I spoke up feeling rather clever. ‘Good.’ said Amlot. ‘We’ve got a squad of ATC (Air Training Corps) youngsters visiting us today, and they have to get a bit of flight experience in. So you have volunteered!’


I had no objection. After the heavy controls of the Halifax, the Oxford would be a bit of fun. And for a time it was. The ATC boys were to be flown in groups of three at a time – one sitting in the Oxford’s co-pilot seat on the right of the pilot and the other two on the step just behind those seats, where the main wing structure passed through the fuselage. I got into the old familiar seat of the Oxford, behind the familiar instrument panel and, feeling very much at home, opened the throttles for the first take-off.


I hoped no-one was watching as we sped up that concrete runway weaving from side to side like a drunken, blindfolded Irishman, for I had got very used to the feel of a Halifax rudder-bar and the Oxford’s was ridiculously light and sensitive by comparison. Anyway, we got airborne and I flew the youngsters around, pointing out the main features on the ground and giving them a glimpse of the magnificence of York Minster from the air. We landed, and three more clambered in. Off we went again – and again – and again. I must have done a dozen trips of twenty minutes or so each, and logbook


entry for that afternoon shows that I flew the Oxford for 4 hours 05 minutes. I began, after the first three hours, to get a bit brassed off with the exercise. Fortunately, small cumulus clouds began to form in the late afternoon at just over 2,000 feet, and the boys were amused to be flown around so close to the clouds, knocking their tops off and doing not-too-steep turns around them. But the clouds, as is their wont in these conditions, kept getting slightly higher with every flight we did, and the youngsters now all wanted to ‘Please go above the clouds sir!’ The final flight of the afternoon eventually came, with the last three boys aboard, still wanting to go above the clouds whose base was now at nearly 6,000 feet. We climbed steeply up, got above them with something to spare, and I did about four stalled turns to the right and left. We landed as quickly after that as I could get down, for two of my passengers had been sick and the other had messed his pants. I really should have been ashamed of myself.


So my flying training at last came to an end. I finished the Course on October 9th with a satisfactory Unit Assessment: As a HB (Heavy Bomber) Pilot… Above Average


ust by chance I had come to the last page of my wartime second logbook. The figure against the ‘Grand Total’ of flying hours now stood at 2102 hours 45 minutes and I know that I must have been one of the most experienced


J 95


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164