search.noResults

search.searching

note.createNoteMessage

search.noResults

search.searching

orderForm.title

orderForm.productCode
orderForm.description
orderForm.quantity
orderForm.itemPrice
orderForm.price
orderForm.totalPrice
orderForm.deliveryDetails.billingAddress
orderForm.deliveryDetails.deliveryAddress
orderForm.noItems
miles had to be covered at ridiculously low speeds with the car’s suspension doing its best to avoid disintegration.


The last flight of that course was on May 8th 1940. I now had 58 hours 45 minutes of flying in my logbook and something else which was rather pleasing. RAF pilots were assessed either once annually or when they left a unit. The assessment could be in one of four categories – Below Average, Average, Above Average, or Exceptional. Normally about 70% of pilots would be assessed as Average, maybe 10% as Below Average, 15% as Above Average and a very, very few as Exceptional. So I was rather pleased to find, in my logbook, that Harben, as Chief Flying Instructor, had put his signature below the entry showing me as Above Average in ‘Proficiency as a Pilot’ and ‘Progress ab Initio’. I see too from my logbook that in those very last days, my instructors had been persuaded to summon up their courage – or maybe shamed into it – and I have recorded “aerobatics” as part of my instruction on May 6th and that last flight of May 8th.


That was goodbye to Burnaston. But I must just mention that P/O Donald Glennie had, during our stay there, taken up with a young nurse from the local mental hospital at Littlemore, just up the main road on the outskirts of Derby. It was serious, and when we all moved on to Cranwell, our next posting, he married her. I was his best man.


* * * * * C


ranwell College is to the Royal Air Force what Sandhurst is to the Army and Dartmouth to the Royal Navy – the cradle for future officers. Its rôle when


once the War started was expanded to train the squads of young men who at an early stage had been accepted for commissions as pilots. Our entire group from Burnaston was posted to continue training at Cranwell on twin-engined Airspeed Oxford aircraft and we constituted the No. 10 War Course at the College. The course started on May 12th 1940 and was to be divided into two sections – flying in the Initial Training Squadron and then in the Advanced Training Squadron to which we graduated on July 1st. The ITS was concerned with teaching us how to handle the Oxford; the ATS was where we were taught to use the aircraft operationally, to fly in formation, practice bombing, reconnaissance and photography.


Cranwell being what it was had fine, permanent buildings with a centrally sited Officers Mess in which we lived in separate bedrooms. Its Commanding Officer was Group Captain Halley and he made sure that the peacetime standards of discipline and behaviour were kept right up. Woe betide any cadet whose brass buttons and black shoes were less then spotlessly gleaming on the compulsory parade when we were drawn up for inspection at eight in the morning. Cadets who moved around the Station on their own were allowed to walk in normal


28


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160  |  Page 161  |  Page 162  |  Page 163  |  Page 164