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T S Volume 39 Number 1 SCIENCE SPECTRUM Minorities in Research Science


Trailblazers ..........................45 Trailblazers actively create new paths for others in science, technology, research and research.


Titan of Science | 2015 Scientist


of the Year ...........................71 Dr. Julio A. Navarro is a leading expert in the Radio frequency field of phased array antennas and micro-electronics and a se- nior technical fellow for Boeing Research & Technology


2015 Emerald Honorees .......54 Diverse faces of modern science make up this year’s pick of some the finest in the nation.


CAREER OUTLOOK.................67


PUBLISHER’S PAGE S


tudies show that imagining the future depends on much of the same neural machinery that is needed for remembering


the past. When John Brooks Slaughter, the 1987 Black Engineer of the Year, graduated from col- lege in 1956, the proportion of African Ameri- cans in the engineering workforce was less than one-half of a percent. Dr. Slaughter said he was the first Black engineer he ever met. Almost 60 years have passed since then, and over that time, diversity programs like the annual BEYA STEM


Conference have been exposing students to practicing engineers, as well op- portunities in engineering.


No doubt about it, Black representation in engineering has improved but


African Americans still comprise only 5 percent of all engineering bachelor’s degrees achieved, with the same percentage of career holders in the workforce. Recent data on engineering degree attainment showed that of the 135,846 engineering degrees awarded in the United States in 2010, African-American graduates represented 5.3 percent of all bachelor’s, 3.5 percent of master’s, and 2 percent of all engineering doctorates.


A NACME report says that risks clearly remain for African-American en- gineering students. Black students entering engineering programs are less likely to complete their degrees, take longer to complete their degrees, and transfer to and complete associates or certificate program at a higher level.


To ensure continued success of this group along the pathway from educa- tion to careers, NACME encourages policymakers, educators and business people to do a number of things: Introduce STEM education at an earlier age to minority students by providing access to academic support programs, and after school tutoring for ACT/SAT preparation; Increase the percentage of Black high school graduates that continue to post-secondary education and select STEM degree options by providing entry-level academic support, financial support and mentoring opportunities. NACME also recommends that business groups sup- port promising students by providing scholarships, tuition reimbursement and job placement for young African Americans pursuing STEM degrees. Additional focus must be made on increasing representation of STEM faculty who are African American.


The 29th annual Black Engineer of the Year Awards Conference is one of the top rated STEM career fairs in America. There are recruiters from Fortune 500 corporations, with more than 100 organizations hiring. It’s great for majors and employees in business, accounting, basic science, math, computer science and more.


Tyrone D. Taborn Publisher and Editorial Director


USBE&IT I WINTER 2015 3


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