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BEST PRACTICES FOR SUCCESS


Some of the brightest minds in STEM, business and government offer their insights and advice about living and working to one’s best potential.


Carol Bennett, a senior program manager, General Dynamics


Corporate Life Y


Marvin Carr, systems engineer and project manager at Innovative STEM Solutions LLC


by Gale Horton Gay ghorton@ccgmag.com


DOE FUNDING GIVES BOOST TO HBCUS: ENERGY PROJECTS GENERATE FRESH IDEAS


ou can be educated, skilled and fully committed to your career, but if you’re unaware of corporate dos and don’ts, your career could end up stalled or in a ditch. We asked a couple of corporate veterans to provide insight into what every young professional should know about navigating their way up the ladder to success.


Those veterans are Carol Bennett, a senior program manager at General Dynamics and the winner of BEYA 2015 Presidents Award, and Marvin Carr, systems engineer and proj- ect manager at Innovative STEM Solutions LLC and the 2015 recipient of the BEYA Dean’s Award.


What are the mistakes young professionals make when new to an organization? Bennett: Every organization has a unique culture and in order to be successful, you must understand how the company


18 USBE&IT I WINTER 2015


works, who the influencers are, what leadership’s strategic goals are and where you can make an impact.


Also, young professionals should understand the organi- zation structure and who reports to whom. I have witnessed throughout my career where young professionals do not understand the leadership chain and send inappropriate cor- respondence to senior leadership. They should proceed through the appropriate chain of command and handle each situation in a professional manner. Carr: Millennials, those of us born between 1982 and 2004, are often applauded for our innovation and new age communica- tion style. Most of all, the catalyst of many of our failures is the desire and pressure from our peers and social-media to resist conformity. More than likely, a young engineering professional will work for a large tech and construction company or a depart- ment of defense institution or one of its contractors. Unless you


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