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PROFILES IN INNOVATION


Career Voices A


“My team are the behind- the-scenes people who make your phones and devices work,” Marbury said.


They are involved in the construction of cell towers and shelters, budgeting, scheduling, and more.


Marbury first became a


manager with the telecommunica- tion’s company in 2011, oversee- ing equipment engineering. When her boss who dealt with the project managers retired, Marbury was promoted to her current position and now handles responsibility for both areas.


“The most challenging aspect of the job is doing double duty,” she said.


Shelvy Marbury, area manager, network engineering, AT&T


However, Marbury credits her previous supervisor for grooming her to take on the job. In fact, she said she didn’t real- ize that her boss’ insistence that she take on various leadership roles was leading to her next step up. “All throughout my career I’ve really, really been blessed with mentors who took me under their wing and shared words of wisdom, lessons learned and experiences that they’ve gone through,” Marbury said. “That’s so very, very important.” She added that her supervisors throughout her career have often advocated on her behalf.


“My supervisors and the leadership structure at AT&T has


by Gale Horton Gay ghorton@ccgmag.com


SUCCESSFUL CAREERS REQUIRE COMMITMENT AND HARD WORK


long successful career isn’t the result of luck or a singular effort but constant hard work, strategic moves and guid- ance from mentors.


That’s the view from two of the 2015 BEYA STEM Confer- ence award winners. Shelvy Marbury, a veteran with AT&T for 18 years, has been bestowed with the title of 2015 professional achievement award winner. Ernest Levert, who has risen through the ranks at Lockheed Martin during his 28-year career with the aerospace and defense gi- ant, has been honored with the 2015 career achievement award. Marbury currently serves as an area manager for Michigan and Indiana responsible for oversight of equipment engineers and proj- ect managers.


been extremely, extremely supportive and encouraging and motivating.”


Marbury describes herself as a low-key person who doesn’t seek the limelight.


“I get a sense of accomplishment just from accomplishing whatever the goal is. Whether you know it or not, people are always watching you. Watching what you do, how you do it. “Every leadership position that I have had, I have been recommended for it. Mentors re- ally pushing me in that direction, usually someone just watching me work. I am not a big talker. I like to let my work speak for me.” Her advice to future engi- neers is simple: be knowledge- able, dependable and accountable. And she recommends developing relationships and not underestimat- ing the importance of “being kind to others. “It’s very challenging, but if you work hard and set the bar for yourself and really operate in excellence, you will succeed.” Marbury, who graduated from


Tuskegee in 1995 with a degree in mechanical engineering, cites her parents for pushing her and her sis- ters (one’s an engineer, the other’s a physician).


“My parents were very good instilling core values and a work ethic,” she said.


She recalled a challenging time when she had graduated from high school and her father had lost his job and become ill. She was


uncertain how she would make it through college. Her dad used the family name — Young — as a way to inspire his daughter. “He said ‘You are Young, you can do anything you want to.’ He was my cheerleader,” Marbury said, reflecting that there were some times when she wanted to give up. “I just couldn’t.” She added that she also felt a connection to her ancestors who had sacrificed so much so she could have opportunities. “It made me work hard,” she said of her years in college.


“Things weren’t easy.”


She continues to draw on those sources of strength as well as her faith in the challenges she faces in her current life. She is


14 USBE&IT I WINTER 2015


www.blackengineer.com


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