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PROFILES IN INNOVATION We celebrate the men and women who are reinventing and reenergizing STEM, business, and government.


One on One F


by Lango Deen ldeen@ccgmag.com 2014 BLACK ENGINEER OF THE YEAR ON LIFE AFTER BEYA


oresight is an increasingly vital skill in the world of work, and for 30 years, the Black Engineer of the Year Awards (BEYA) Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) Conference has exposed young people to innovators who are transforming America’s future — from information systems and cyber security to energy, health care and space exploration.


Stephanie C. Hill is one such example. She was named the 2014 Black Engineer of the Year for her outstanding leadership during a 27-year engineering career and commitment to promot- ing science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education.


After graduating with a Bachelor of Science in computer science and economics from University of Maryland, Balti- more County, Lockheed Martin Corp. brought her on board as a software engineer. Now, almost three decades later, she is vice president and general manager of Lockheed’s Information Systems and Global Solutions (IS&GS) civil business. In Hill’s current role, she leads 10,000 employees who are responsible for systems and services in information and cyber security, finance, transportation, citizen protection, energy, health care and space exploration. The unit serves various non-defense U.S. govern- ment agencies, foreign governments and regulated commercial industries.


“Stephanie Hill is an exceptional leader, and I’m honored to have worked with her,” said Marillyn Hewson, chairman, president and CEO of Lockheed Martin Corporation, in a news release highlighting Hill’s 2014 BEYA win. “Stephanie has established herself as a leader who drives technical and business performance on behalf of her customers while strengthening and developing the next generation of leaders.” In a nutshell, Hill’s secret to a successful career. A willingness to build teams, technical know-how of what constitutes customer service, individual pride in taking author- ity, and making things better for the next generation made her a stand out. By 27, Hill’s work with missile systems like the Navy’s Sea Sparrow earned her the “Most Promising Engineer” award at the 1993 BEYA STEM Conference. Twenty-one years later, she was named the 2014 Black Engineer of the Year for career leadership and her demonstrated commitment to promot- ing science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) education.


Since she won the highest honor at BEYA, work-life has been incredibly exciting and incredibly busy, Hill said over the phone a few days before 2014’s Thanksgiving. “We have been helping our customers fulfill their critical missions that impact citizens’ daily lives,” she enthused. The missions run from information and citizen protection to health care, energy, water, space exploration and everything in between. A “Next Generation Identification System” developed for


10 USBE&IT I WINTER 2015


Stephanie C. Hill, vice president and general manager of Lockheed Martin’s information systems and global solutions civil business.


the FBI is used by more than 18,000 law enforcement agencies across the country, Hill said. The identification system has the ability to process up to 650,000 transactions a day, with 99.6 percent accuracy and a response time as low as 10 seconds, which helped identify over 330,000 fugitives in 2013. Lockheed Martin’s IS&GS civil also supports also sup-


ports efforts of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which is taking precautions to prevent the further spread of Ebola within the United States. The current Ebola epidemic is the largest in history, affecting multiple countries with the hard- est hit being Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. “We developed a decision making tool for the CDC and help


run their emergency management operations center taking hundreds of calls every day from around the world,” she explained. Hill’s division supports other federal health agencies, in- cluding the centers for Medicare and Medicaid, which provides


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