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Andy Berry, CEO of touraid, also explained how an MBA has enabled him to make a difference in the lives of the disadvantaged.


“I chose to study the MBA simply because I wanted to grow the charity and I wanted to continue the work I was doing, but make it bigger and better,” he said.


The charity uses sport to create long term links between children from disadvantaged communities overseas and schools and clubs in the UK. It is still expanding and will soon be bringing over girl’s groups to add to the 57 already organised for children, many of whom are orphans or street children from places like Cambodia, Rwanda and Trinidad and Tobago.


“The tours give kids from the UK and overseas a chance to experience new


cultures as well as creating binding links between communities. Our work though really starts on their return as we ensure all the children have pathways in education to adulthood as well as youth leadership opportunities so they can act as the catalysts for change,” he said.


“I set up touraid because I wanted to make a difference. I wanted to be able to help improve the lives of more children and in order to do that to the best of my ability, I needed to be sure the charity was running as effectively and efficiently as possible.”


For Andy, and for an increasing number of MBA alumni, the bottom line is the MBA will enable them to make a difference, which makes all the hard work worthwhile.


To find out more about the Association of MBAs, to research MBA study and to find an accredited MBA programme, visit www.ambaguide.com


*The fundamental role of a Global AMBAssador is to champion a global MBA alumni network to support their peers’ engagement and participation. The Global AMBAssadors inspire others to become active in the network. They are an integral part of promoting accredited MBAs to employers and MBA seekers.


For more information visit www.mbaworld.com


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