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MBAS HELPING THOSE THAT NEED IT MOST


As the perception of the MBA being linked to large corporate organisations is changing, we are seeing more and more alumni use their MBA skills in a diverse range of careers paths. This is largely attributed to the fact that almost 500 of the world’s business schools participate in the Principles for Responsible Management Education (PRME). This United Nation initiative, which was developed in 2007 by a task force of representatives from leading business schools and academic institutions, aims to inspire and champion responsible management education, research and thought leadership globally.


The schools involved are all committed to helping develop a new generation of business leaders. And many of the students, who learn skills to manage complex challenges faced by business and society in the 21st century, are


eager to make a difference in the world. The Association of MBAs (AMBA) has recently spoken to two MBA alumni who are doing just that – using their invaluable entrepreneurial skills to help those that need it most.


Global AMBAssador* and consultant for the Indian-based consulting firm MART, Nidhi Singh, is working on programmes which provide clean drinking water and electricity to rural communities in India.


“Some of the key aspects of my role include improving transport in rural areas by introducing electric vehicles, taking FMCG [fast moving


consumer goods] brands to the remote parts of India and building systems for distribution of contraceptives for women,” she said.


“Studying for an MBA has been advantageous in terms of providing me with an understanding of the business perspective of a social idea. Any initiative which has the objective to provide a service to Bottom of the Pyramid (BoP) consumers has to serve the people, as well as provide them with sustainable financial support. Charity is not the only solution to bringing people at the BoP out of poverty – sustainable, innovative and robust business models have to be created to reach these consumers. Every day, I try and mould the concepts of marketing, finance and most importantly leadership to the diverse geographies I work in. It is challenging but satisfying as I know that my hard work will help light a bulb in those households which have not had electricity for centuries.”


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