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‘People will forget what you say and forget what you do, but they will always remember how you make them feel’.


“I recommend having an


element where students can interact with a range of representatives – both on a peer to peer and executive level”…


Tom Chesterton, Tonic Agency: “One of my favourite quotes is from poet Maya Angelou (via Simon Cowell): ‘People will forget what you say and forget what you do, but they will always remember how you make them feel’. As employers we often spend our time planning what we want to say and what we want to do, when we’d be better advised to begin with understanding what motivates the people we need and giving them an experience that makes them feel great about joining our business. The employers that communicate the humanity of their brand and make those emotional connections always gain competitive advantage.”


Mark Stow, Lincoln University:


“Be as diverse and inclusive as possible in all that you do. A physical presence on all campuses is, granted, a ‘tall order’. Many institutions that are overlooked by graduate recruiters have students with a huge amount of talent and potential. Student societies like Enactus and Bright Futures are great ways to engage directly with students. Similarly, in an era of new technologies and heightened social mobility agendas, there are alternatives to face to face contact. Online profi les, vid-casts, podcasts, blogs linking to or embedded on careers service websites − are all excellent ways to reach out to a much bigger pool of students. Finally, more direct links and communication with careers services will ensure that your opportunities and deadlines are proactively promoted to ALL students. Ultimately, make yourself more visible, available and accessible!”


“Rigorously question anyone who uses the word ‘innovation.’ I think it’s too often used to justify approaches that are


expensive or unlikely to


work, solely on the basis they are perceived to be new.


Tom Viggers, Graduate Promotions: “Rigorously question anyone who uses the word ‘innovation.’ I think it’s too often used to justify approaches that are expensive or unlikely to work, solely on the basis they are perceived to be new. “That’s not to say I think employers shouldn’t try new


approaches; on the contrary, I think they should try them all the time. But I think they should do so in ways that have quick measures built in so that they can very quickly see what has and hasn’t been cost-effective, and analyse the reasons why. I think it’s important to think about innovation as a constant process of tweaking and evolving (at least behind the scenes – a new iteration of an approach might appear to be completely original on campus). It absolutely shouldn’t be an annual Google search for the latest fad!”


Andrew Ferguson, University of York: “Consider using a variety of means to boost recognition of your organisation’s employer brand on campus. Visits and fairs are both effective, but our experience at York suggests that longer term involvement with activities such as supporting extra-curricular skills training, engaging


with student societies and running business or commercial challenges raises the visibility of your brand overall. Most careers services will be happy to offer ideas or advise on opportunities unique to their institutions.”


Charlotte Blake, On-Campus Promotions: “I recommend having an element where students can interact with a range of representatives – both on a peer to peer and executive level – as well as providing information about the company culture and the opportunities available. Personalising your event to the university, i.e. inviting a representative down who graduated from that university or relating your events to the exam period, is really appreciated and valued by students.”


Bob Gilworth, University of Leeds: “My top tip: understand how the careers service works and then work through it to maximum effect. Doing the essential logistics with the employer/events team is sensible and logical, but if you understand how the whole service works and how it connects to the broader institution and student body, you could get a lot more out of the relationship and save yourself a lot of time and money. Most services are extremely well connected to academic departments and are seen as the legitimate gateway. If you don’t know where to start, ask the Director/ Head of Service. We are here to help.”


Richard Gill, JustOnCampus:


“Letting your employees do the talking speaks volumes about you. Finding new ways for employees to connect with students on a personal level – throughout the year – will get the attention of students. The innovation comes from getting your employees out on campus, or introduced through online events, in original ways that are relevant to the student’s year of study. When you engage at a personable and approachable level, students will feel stronger ties to your organisation. Forming sincere relationships with students early on will create the right reaction! It’s well worth the effort.”


John Storer, SAS: “Brand ambassadors are becoming an increasingly essential part of an organisation’s campus strategy. Whilst using a third party solution can be effi cient, and offer a certain guarantee of marketing savvy for those representing your brand, gathering and training your own brand ambassadors from your organisations alumni can make a huge difference to the impact they have on your audience. The ability to offer an authentic insight based on fi rst-hand experience is often more powerful than a well performed marketing shtick.”


GRADUATE RECRUITER 21


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