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healthbriefs


Fruits and Veggies Can Help Us Kick Butts T


he first long-term study on the relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and smoking cessation offers good news: Eating more healthy produce can help smokers quit the habit and remain tobacco-free longer. Researchers from New York’s University of Buffalo School of Public Health and Health Professions surveyed 1,000 smokers ages 25 and over from around the country. In a 14-month follow-up, they were asked if they had abstained from tobacco use during the previous month. Those that consumed the most produce were three times more likely to have been tobacco-free for at least 30 days than those that ate the least amount of produce.


Smokers with greater fruit and vegetable consumption also smoked fewer cigarettes per day, waited longer to smoke their first one and scored lower on a common test of nicotine dependence. The findings, published online in the Nicotine and Tobacco Research journal, remained consistent even when adjust- ed for age, gender, race, ethnicity, education and household income.


t’s already known that resveratrol, a compound found in grape skins and red wine, can improve cardiovascular health and help prevent strokes. Now a University of Missouri School of Medicine (Columbia) researcher has discovered that it can make prostate tumor cells more susceptible to radiation treatment, increasing the likelihood of a full recovery from all types of prostate cancer, including aggressive tumors.


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Garlic May Help Alleviate Cystic Fibrosis T


RESVERATROL CAN AID PROSTATE CANCER TREATMENT


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FLAVONOIDS PROTECT MEN AGAINST PARKINSON’S


indings published in the journal Neurology add to a grow- ing body of evidence that regular consumption of


flavonoids, found in berries, teas, apples and red wines, can positively affect hu- man health. According to new research on 130,000 men and women under- taken by Harvard University, in Boston, and the UK’s University of East Anglia, men that regularly consumed the most flavonoid-rich foods were 40 percent less likely to develop Parkinson’s disease than those that ate the least.


No similar protective link was found for women. It is the first human study to show that flavonoids can help protect neurons against diseases of the brain.


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he American Society for Microbiology reports that by age 18, about 80 percent of patients with cys- tic fibrosis are chronically infected with the bacterium pseudomonas aeruginosa, which promotes an inflamma- tory response that destroys lung tissue. The infection frequently leads to seri- ous related health issues. According to collaborative research led by Tim Holm Jakobsen, Ph.D., and Michael Givskov, Ph.D., of the University of Copenhagen, in Denmark, garlic, which acts as a powerful natural antibiotic, could help. The onion-related herb contains ajoene, the major component of a multitude


of sulfur-containing compounds, which is produced when garlic is crushed. Ajo- ene inhibits the expression of 11 key genes controlled by cell-to-cell communica- tion and is regarded as crucial to the ability of the bacterium to cause disease.


7 Hudson County NAHudson.com


EXCESSIVE DIETARY FAT MAY HINDER CONCEPTION


ne reason for a couple’s inability to conceive could be linked to too much fat in the male’s diet. A study by Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital of 99 U.S. men uncovered an association between a high fat intake and lower sperm count and concentration. Results were published in the journal Human Reproduction.


Men that consumed the most satu- rated fats had a 35 percent lower total sperm count and 38 percent lower sperm concentration than men that ate the least amount of such fats. Moreover, men that ate more omega-3 polyunsaturated fats—the type of healthful fat often found in fish and plant oils—had better-formed sperm than men that ate less.


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