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21: No, Seriously, Grab Your Nuts Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men ages 15 to 35, but it’s usually curable if caught early enough. I strong- ly urge you to grab your testicles and check them for bumps at least once a month. Each testicle should feel smooth and slightly soft, and one should hang slightly lower than the other, like two avocados (which, in Aztec, actually means “testicles”) growing on a tree.


22: Hit the Dance Floor Crosswords and card games aren’t the only way to keep a brain razor sharp. It turns out that any kind of dancing with complex moves is stimulating enough to give neurons a workout. Even the simplest moves provide some physical exercise. So don’t be such a wallflower on your next night out. As a bonus, dancing may help you with tip number 17.


23: Do Your Penis a Favor Step on a treadmill. Men who exercise enough to burn 200 calories a day sig- nificantly lower their chances of impo- tence. That’s because impotence often has the same cause as heart attacks: blocked arteries. Your penis is like a dipstick for your arteries, so check it. If you’re interested in keeping it up later in life, lace up the sneakers now.


24: Learn to Cook Do you think you know how much butter goes into preparing those mashed potatoes at a restaurant? You’re probably off by half. If you can cook, you not only save money, but also gain control over what goes into your meals. Plus, for most women, a man who knows how to cook is as sexy as one who stars in movies. I have trouble boiling water. Thankfully, I’m already married.


25: Some Pills


Should Be Popped The indoor life gives modern man protection from the elements. Un- fortunately, roughly half of us are deficient in vitamin D, for which the sun is a major source. This crucial vitamin may aid in fighting cancer, diabetes and heart disease. I take a 1,000 IU supplement each morning.


13 Hudson County NAHudson.com


DOESN’T WORK


WHAT


According to information found in the Congressio- nal Record (S.J. Res. 179), many men are reluctant to visit their health center or physician for regular screening examinations for reasons ranging from fear to lack of information or cost. Dr. Harvey Si- mon, author of The Harvard Medical School Guide to Men’s Health, says that 30 percent of American men don’t have a regular doctor and that many of those men fall into two mentalities:


n The John Wayne mentality: The macho idea holds that men have to be strong and just grit their teeth and not think about their vulnerabilities, but go straight ahead.


n Ostrich mentality: Afraid to face up to their vulnerabilities, these men feel that by putting their head in the sand, maybe the problem(s) will all just go away.


Dr. Simon suggests that such attitudes, combined with other risky or foolish behavior, could be responsible for the shorter life expectancy of men compared to women.


Dr. Mehmet Oz is a professor of cardiac surgery at Columbia University and a founder of the Complementary Medicine Program at New York-Presbyterian Hospital. He is co-author of the award-winning Healing from the Heart: A Leading Sur- geon Combines Eastern and Western Traditions to Create the Medicine of the Future and YOU: The Owner’s Manual: An Insider’s Guide to the Body that Will Make You Healthier and Younger. He has frequently appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show and currently hosts The Dr. Oz Show.


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