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HARDWARE SMC ESCAPE 8


When easy application and removal of an escape descender is desired, the SMC Escape 8 is a convenient choice. Familiar figure 8 shape is modified and optimized for descending on small diameter ropes.


Key Features: Compact • Lightweight


Height: 0.38” (9.0 mm) » Width: 2.73” (6.9 cm) » Length: 2.80” (7.1 cm) » Weight: 1.7 oz (48 g) » MBS: 14 kN (3147 lbf)


Gold Black USA MADE CERTIFIED


SM126501N SM126502N


$22.00 $22.00


BERRY COMPLIANT CERTIFIED NFPA 1983, E (FOR ROPES 7.5 mm - 9.5 mm) NFPA 1983, E (FOR ROPES 7.5 mm - 9.5 mm)


PMI® PMI®


PED


Personal Escape Descender can be pre-rigged on an escape rope and stored ready to go. Two threading options allow the user to pre-set the descender for the user’s weight and desired friction for rappelling.


Key Features: Must be pre-rigged on rope • Optional high friction rigging method • Perfect companion with PMI®


Element (page 14)


Height: 0.50” (1.3 cm) » Width: 1.63” (4.1 cm) » Length: 2.94” (7.5 cm) » Weight: 1.5 oz (42 g) » MBS: 13.5 kN (3035 lbf)


HD26024 USA MADE $36.33 BERRY COMPLIANT


DESCENT CONTROL DEVICES


ESCAPE


NFPA USE CATEGORIES Equipment that is certified to meet NFPA 1983-12 will also bear a letter designator: T (Technical), G (General), or E (Escape). Look for the NFPA E rating on PMI Personal Escape Ropes and hardware. E = Escape: Products rated with an E are considered suitable for escape, and should never be used more than once in an actual emergency situation. Search lines do not generally carry the “E” rating, and (unless otherwise noted by the manufacturer) should not be used for escape. The PMI® Element Kit (page 87) and the PMI® meet the NFPA 1983, E requirements.


X-It Kit (page 87)


The PED can be rigged two ways: a high friction rig and standard rig. Versatility at its best.


HARDWARE


DESCENT CONTROL DEVICES


69


CATALOG NO


213


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