This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
ROPE


SEARCH LINES


Specialized Search Lines are a must for Rapid Intervention Team Search and Rescue operations. They should be easy to deploy, be hard to snag, have enough body to be felt through a firefighter’s glove, and be made for retracing your path in a low to zero visibility environment. PMI offers the Rapid Search Line II for your RIT application and training. We also offer pre-rigged kits and build-your-own kits for creating a personalized search and rescue tool. As of the 2012 edition of NFPA 1983, there is not a standard for search lines.


PMI® RAPID SEARCH LINE II


Designed by firefighters for firefighters, this supple search line packs away small but is highly grippable even with a gloved hand. Highly visible this search line provides maximum visibility in the fire ground environment. Not intended for rappelling.


Note: Both nylon and aramid fibers will burn if exposed to flame, but nylon will melt at much lower temperatures.


Key Features: Core is one large Kevlar® 9 mm (23/64”) cable + nylon filler cables •


High visibility • 9 mm • High tenacity nylon sheath Weight: 43.0 g/m » MBS: Not Rated


1 m (3.3 ft) 11 m (36 ft) 15 m (49 ft)


Orange/Yellow SR090SL001E SR090SL011E SR090SL015E


30 m (100 ft) SR090SL030E 61 m (200 ft) SR090SL061E


USA MADE $2.74


$30.14 $41.10 $80.50


$161.10 BERRY COMPLIANT


FIBERS PARA-ARAMIDS


Para-Aramids such as Technora™ offer excellent heat resistance as compared with other rope fibers: roughly twice that of nylon or polyester! However, do not be misled into believing that ropes made of these fibers will not “burn through” or fail. Although Para-Aramids like Kevlar® and Technora™ do not melt, they do decompose. While the official decomposition temperature seems high (932° F or 500° C), the high temperature working limit is only 350° F (176.7° C) - just about 100 degrees higher than nylon or polyester.


You should also be aware of limitations in these fibers when compressive forces from rappel devices are combined with axial forces and shock loads such as might occur when escaping a hazardous environment. Be sure your choice of rope and rappel device system is well tested before putting it into actual use.


UHMWPE


Ultra high molecular weight polyethylene - although offering incredible strength, this fiber has dangerously low melting temperature and low coefficient of friction, and therefore is not a good choice for an escape rope. Fibers like Dyneema®


and Spectra®


offer a high temperature working limit of only 150° F (65.6° C).


NYLON AND POLYESTER


Nylon and polyester are the tried-and-true workhorses of the life safety world and a variety of Escape ropes are made with one, or some combination of, these two fibers. On a practical level, these are still a very good all-around choice for an escape rope in terms of overall safety and cost. Nylon 6,6 and polyester fibers melt at 489-500° F (254-260° C) and offer a high temperature working limit of around 250-275° F (121-135° C).


melt at 302° F (150° C) and


ROPE


SEARCH LINES


13


CATALOG NO


213


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116