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ROPE


ROPE CARE


We wouldn’t be a life safety rope and equipment company if we didn’t have the right products to take care of your hard working gear. Your gear gets as dirty as the job and deserves special attention and its own set of cleaning and protective gear. The Rope Tracker and the Bokat Rope Washer are just a couple of key products that are perfect additions to your gear cache.


Protecting your gear while in use comes naturally to most of us, but care and maintenance extends to storage and carrying as well. Use PMI®


Rope Bags and Packs, or the PMI® all your rope and gear with ease.


ROPE CARE There are a few things that you want to keep in mind when handling your rope.


1) Use edge protection when it’s necessary to run the rope over rough surfaces or sharp edges. Also don’t run moving ropes over stationary ropes (a moving rope can cut right through a stationary rope).


2) Avoid overloading your rope, so know your rope strength and be mindful of it when using it. Avoid stepping on your rope because if the floor is rough or dirty it can rub dirt into the rope or be abrasive.


3) Ultraviolet light can cause some damage to ropes as well. The current materials used are more resistant to UV light than they were years ago but it’s a good idea to avoid exposing them to UV light for long periods of time.


4) Be sure that your rope is compatible with the gear you’re using. Check your pulleys, descenders, ascenders, and prusik cords for the rope sizes and diameters that they’re made for.


5) Avoid chemicals at all costs because even the fumes can damage the rope and there won’t necessarily be any visible signs of damage.


Photo Tim Banfield


6) Finally, avoid heat when using or storing your rope as extreme heat can melt a rope and lessen the strength. Be aware of the ambient conditions your rope will be used in or stored in; for example, using a rope in fire rescue or storing a rope in the trunk of a car during the summer. Knowing the temperatures that your rope is built to withstand is essential to caring for your rope.


BOKAT ROPE WASHER BY PMI®


A built in brush makes this the best cleaning rope washer we’ve ever used. Just hook it up to your hose, turn on the water, and pull the rope through the washer. The water loosens dirt and the brush scrubs it off.


Key Features: Easy to use • Use with PMI® RC48002 USA MADE


One of a kind scrubbing bristles provide just enough cleaning power to get the dirtiest rope ready for action.


PMI® LAUNDRY BAG


Use this protective black polyester mesh bag when washing rope, webbing, and other soft goods. Use several bags to keep like-items sorted, keep your gear together and prevent it from tangling during washing. Holds 250 ft of 11 mm Classic Static.


Key Features: Great for keeping your gear sorted as well as for washing • Works with front or top loading machines Width: 23.00” (58.4 cm) » Length: 30.50” (77.5 cm) » Weight: 6.6 oz (187 g)


RB44046 USA MADE PMI® ROPE SOAP


Giving you a clean rope that will last. PMI® grease, soot, smoke, and other grime.


’s Rope Soap gently removes dirt, oil,


Key Features: 1 bottle does up to 12 loads • 6 to 8 oz with 15 gallons of water • Biodegradable • Low PH Weight: 2.06 lbs (934 g)


RC48031 $13.90 ROPE ROPE CARE $23.50 $42.00 Rope Soap


Height: 4.00” (10.2 cm) » Width: 2.50” (6.4 cm) » Length: 12.00” (30.5 cm) » Weight: 1.19 lbs (425 g)


Riggers Bag to store and carry


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CATALOG NO


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