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ST REGIS OSAKA OSAKA, JAPAN


LIGHTING DESIGN KAORU MENDE, IALD KENTARO TANAKA, ASSOCIATE IALD MISA FUJII


LIGHTING PLANNERS ASSOCIATES INC


ADDITIONAL CREDITS ARCHITECTURE NIKKEN SEKKEI LTD TAISEI CORPORATION GLAMOROUS


GA DESIGN INTERNATIONAL OWNER


SEKISUI HOUSE


PHOTOGRAPHY © TOSHIO KANEKO, LIGHTING PLANNERS ASSOCIATES INC


The architectural and interior design concept of St. Regis Osaka comes from the beauty blossomed during the Azuchi-Momoyama Period just before the Edo Period in Japan. The zen form of thought “Wabi Sabi,” or the serene sense of Japanese beauty, is combined with a little glamour to complete the design concept. Fittingly, the lighting design is based on the keywords of “serenity + shadows + hospitality.”


“Masterfully illuminated throughout, the lighting


emphasizes the important while creating pleasant ambient illumination,” one judge commented.


While the amount of light is moderate, each space is softly enclosed and lighting arranged to create comfortable light and shadows. A dimming system also monitors daily changes in sunlight and adjusts accordingly for a very eco- friendly plan.


The lighting design aims to unify the spaces by auto- matically adjusting lux levels with a dimming system.


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Glareless fixtures also help to naturally draw the line of vision towards the high-quality furniture and materials used. Indirect lighting in the bar, for example, helps complete the rich atmosphere created by the gold leaf inlayed ceiling and dark green walls. A delicate balance of ambient light and minimal use of glareless accent light is a striking balance. Luxurious furniture, fabrics, and artwork are all prepared for the relaxation of hotel guests.


The lighting design carefully highlights each of these gorgeous objects.


AWARD OF MERIT


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