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THE NATIONAL SEPTEMBER 11 MEMORIAL


NEW YORK, NY USA


LIGHTING DESIGN PAUL MARANTZ, FIALD ZACK ZANOLLI CARLA ROSS-ALLEN BARRY CITRIN, IALD FISHER MARANTZ STONE


ADDITIONAL CREDITS ARCHITECTURE MICHAEL ARAD


LANDSCAPE ARCHITECT PETER WALKER AND PARTNERS


CLIENT THE NATIONAL SEPTEMBER 11 MEMORIAL & MUSEUM


CONSTRUCTION MANAGER THE PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY


PHOTOGRAPHY © CARIDAD SOLA PHOTOGRAPHY © THE PORT AUTHORITY OF NEW YORK AND NEW JERSEY © FISHER MARANTZ STONE


In downtown Manhattan, the National 9/11 Memorial opened on the 10th anniversary of the 2001 tragedy. Through collaboration and persistence, a glimmer of solace and peace has surfaced in the midst of a highly bureaucratic and emotionally arresting project that was conceptualized by one, orchestrated by many, and created for all. “A quietly stunning solution that brings the memorial to


life after dark,” one judge admired of the project. After extensive studies and select site visits around Manhattan, the designers were able to dissuade city officials that the initial 5 footcandle requirement for the plaza was excessive. In the finished project, both the horizontal and vertical illuminance is .5 footcandles. For a project fraught with challenges and restrictions, the lighting vocabulary is relatively simple, as only three fixture types


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light the project.


Custom pole fixtures, aligned with the landscape grid, feature an up-down lighting component with four T8 lamps behind a stack of prismatic refractors. Humane and gentle illumination of the visitors was the principal challenge. Equally important was to provide adequate vertical illumination for the security cameras.


The two fountains, set in the original footprint of the


AWARD OF EXCELLENCE


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