This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
www.green-technology.org/gcsummit


CONCURRENT SESSION DESCRIPTIONS


3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Regional Green Economic Development Case Study: Greenwise Sacramento


Launched by Sacramento Mayor Kevin Johnson in May 2010, Greenwise Sacramento created a shared vision to transform the Sacramento area into the greenest region in the country and a hub for clean technology. Learn how the successful initiative involved hundreds of participants over an eight-month planning timeline, featured global thought leaders who inspired a bold outlook and resulted in the Greenwise Sacramento Regional Action Plan unveiled by the Mayor at the 2011 State of the City. Te Plan’s transfor- mational goals and dozens of strategies and actions will be implemented by a new Greenwise Joint Venture. As Rob- ert F. Kennedy, Jr. said during his visit to Sacramento, “Good environmental policy is always good economic policy.” Hear about the early successes of Greenwise that demonstrate job growth and environmen- tal stewardship are complementary.


Moderator: Elizabeth Huber, Assistant Director, CalRecycle


Presenter: Julia Burrows, Managing Partner, Valley Vision, Inc. and Greenwise Sacramento Project Manager


ROOM 204 Reducing Our Footprint Track


10:45 am – noon Water Management


Water efficiency and conservation are quickly becoming as important as energy efficiency to the long term well-being of Californians. New laws and mandates,


including the new CALGreen Building Code for urban and agricultural water use are in place. Tis session will focus on explaining their impacts. Water man- agement experts will also show examples of how cutting edge irrigation technol- ogy is saving cities millions of gallons a year with automatic compliance to new mandates.


Moderator: Kelley M. Tabor, Attorney, Somach Simmons & Dunn


Presenters: Chris Manchuck, Co-founder and Vice President Channel Sales, HydroPoint Data Systems Richard Restuccia, Director of Water Management Solutions, Valleycrest Land- scape Maintenance Kamyar Guivetchi, P.E., Manager, State- wide Integrated Water Management, Cali- fornia Department of Water Resources


1:15 pm – 2:30 pm Transportation – EV’s and Infrastructure


Tis session will discuss the latest in electric vehicles. Find out how counties and cities are preparing the infrastruc- ture for these vehicles.


Moderator: Craig Duehring, Air Resources Engineer, California Air Resources Board


Presenters: Rafael Reyes, Director, Bay Area Climate Collaborative Jon Martens, Facilities Operations Division Manager, Sonoma County Rachel Grossman, EV Manager, Bay Area Climate Collaborative Dave Head, Fleet Manager, Sonoma County


3:00 pm – 4:00 pm Incentives for Alternative Vehicles and Fuels


Tis presentation identifies primary funding sources and outlines techniques that may be used to remain up to date on current federal, state, and local funding opportunities for alternative fuel and clean air advanced technology vehicles and infrastructure. Te presentation also includes a general overview of strategies to employ for creating and following up on successful grant proposals.


Presenter: Richard Battersby, Executive Director, East Bay Clean Cities Coalition Jim McKinney, Manager, Emerging Fuels, California Energy Commission David Almeida, Associate Program Man- ager, Transportation, California Center for Sustainable Energy


ROOM 203 Generating and Managing Energy Track


10:45 am – noon Smart Grid


Te “smart grid” promises a new relation- ship between consumers and electricity providers, using information technology to enable two-way communication between consumers (including appliances) and sup- pliers. What innovations are coming that can improve the end-user experience, save consumers money and improve energy security?


Moderator: Jim Parks, Program Manager, Energy Efficiency and Customer R & D, Sacra- mento Municipal Utility District


19


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48