This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
LMP 1 REAR WINGS


increase in frequency during the 2008 season. At the September 2008 ACO press conference at Silverstone, the ACO’s Daniel Poissenot reflected on the reasoning behind the changes. ‘Safety is important, we have invested a lot in circuits, but cars are going faster and faster. This has created accidents and has concerned us. We have to reduce the speed of the cars.’ Ironically, he then added, ‘…and reduce costs. Cars should be cheaper to build and cheaper to race.’ The rear wing changes were quite simple: a reduction in span from 2 metres to 1.6m and a shortening of wing chord from


“a desire to


simply reduce cornering speeds”


300 to 250mm. The rear wing changes weren’t necessarily a direct response to the yaw incidents, but were made more out of a desire to simply reduce cornering speeds in general, as that was felt to be a contributing factor to the blow overs. The immediate effect was


a loss of total downforce and a significant change in front- to-rear aerodynamic balance. Between seasons development naturally produced balanced cars, but with perhaps slightly less downforce and a little more drag. Ultimately, that was the goal of the regulation change. And you can’t argue against the results. Lap times did indeed


January 2012 • www.racecar-engineering.com 73


No cheap solution I


An investigation into the effect of the ACO’s 2009 rear wing regulations BY MIKE FULLER


n 2009, the ACO introduced new rear wing regulations in response to a spate of frightening, yaw-induced blow overs that seemed to


The rear wing changes decreed a reduction in span from 2m to1.6m and a shortening of the wing chord from 300-250mm. No one expected it to lead to a complete re-design of the uprights as well


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100