This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
LAND SPEED RECORD CONTENDERS – AUSTRALIA


Silver Bullet RV1 T


he Bullet Project’s principals, Mark Stephenson and Paul Noone, started their


project in 2009, and refer to themselves as ‘new kids on the block’. However, an ambitious timeframe has been set, with Silver Bullet JV1, a jet-powered variant, hopefully testing wheel, driver capsule and ‘aeroshell’ concepts in late 2012. ‘This will give us actual data at speeds of 600+mph to compare with computer generated analysis,’ explained Noone. Such speeds would also collect an Australian land speed record along the way. The team then hope to take


to the salt in 2014. ‘It’s a tight schedule we know,’ continued Noone, ‘but this is what we need to keep in line with the seasoned professionals. Currently, we are on target, with everything in place ready to start working. Now, like all the other teams, we need to find funding and are, at present, securing professional assistance. We have plans for a full-size model of RV1 to be


constructed, followed by an Australia-wide tour to raise the project’s public profile.’ RV1 is one of the smaller


designs at just 30ft (9.14m) long, with a composite monocoque construction with detachable panels for internal access. ‘Our thinking is that a moulded chassis and ‘aeroshell’ eliminates joints, and that every joint is a potential weak point,’ says Noone.


ENGINE Like the other Australian entry, RV1 will use rocket-only propulsion, for reasons Noone explains: ‘Inlet ducts [for a jet engine] present a big challenge that is eliminated with a pure rocket car. Such ducts tend to de-stabilise a car by moving the centre of pressure forwards, and increase drag by creating an abrupt increase in cross section that generates additional shock waves. By contrast, because liquid propellant rocket motors are so light, it’s easier to juggle other components to optimally place the c of g.’


TECH SPEC


Silver Bullet RV1 (www.bulletproject.com)


Length: 30ft (9.14m) Weight: 6000kg (13,200lb) dry Chassis: composite monocoque


Engine: six AUSROC 2.5 LOX / kerosene throttle-able; pressure- fed liquid bi-propellant rockets


Thrust: 47,000lb (210kN)


Wheels: fixed hubs with rotating ’tyres’ on nitrogen-fed ‘air’ bearings; integral suspension


Brakes: ballutes; possible air brakes; wheel brakes


Six AUSROC liquid bi-propellant


oxygen / kerosene ‘throttle-able’ rocket motors are being used, fed by pressurised nitrogen. The Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology is currently designing these for the Australian Space Research Institute, so this is an all-Australian engine project. The aim is to exceed 1000mph.


Details are sparse at this early


stage but one area the team does go into is an interesting wheel design, intended to reduce rotational inertia using a fixed hub with a rotating rim. The hub is said to incorporate an internal suspension system comprising rubber blocks and adjustable friction dampers. The wheel rim will then rotate around the hub and be supported on air bearings that will actually be fed with nitrogen from an onboard supply. Braking from high speed will be by ‘IADs’ or inflatable aerodynamic decelerators, sometimes known as ballutes, while low-speed braking will be via friction from within the wheel design. The team is also investigating a new design of air brake for medium speeds. Another possibly unique


concept among the current batch of designs is a detachable driver safety capsule. The aim would be for the capsule to self-level and land softly in the event of an unforeseen or unpreventable incident.


28 www.racecar-engineering.com • January 2012


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100