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“The target was Campbell’s 301mph record of 1935”


helpful suggestion because, for all his influence, Stuck had no finance for the project. He was, however, resourceful and did the unthinkable, by pitching the project, complete with Porsche as designer, to Daimler Benz (DB). Fortunately, despite being the opposition, Porsche and Stuck were highly regarded at the rival manufacturer and, after a little soul searching, they agreed to build the car under the title Type 80. Apart from anything, they were worried that Stuck would take the promise of DB’s aero engines and have the car built by someone else.


TARGET: 2000BHP The target was Campbell’s 301mph record of 1935 and Porsche’s calculations showed he needed more than 2000bhp to break it. That would mean two engines, a solution that both Eyston’s Thunderbolt and Cobb’s Railton Special would employ over the next couple of years, each utilising a pair of Rolls Royce V12s. However, knowing the engines would be used at ground level, Daimler Benz was able to promise a much higher output, enough to break the record with just one engine. This pleased Porsche, who


clearly recognised the greatest challenge to pushing the record higher was aerodynamic drag. The standard approach was to assemble as much power as could be squeezed into a chassis and wrap it in a slippery shape. But Porsche looked at the problem slightly differently. At these speeds the limiting factor is not just the amount of power, but the ability to put it down as you push


against an unyielding wall of air. Porsche stayed with the mid-


engined concept he was using successfully on the Auto Union grand prix cars, allowing him to put the driver low down at the front of the car. Strictly speaking, the 600 series engine was a 300-degree V12, although most would regard it as an inverted 60-degree v. It was used in the Messerschmitt


January 2012 • www.racecar-engineering.com 33


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