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ARGENTINIAN TOURING CARS


Unchartered territory


The Argentinian TC2000


category is one of the top 10 Touring Car series in the world. And it is about to go V8


BY ANDREW COTTON


T


he Argentinian motorsport scene may not have the variety of other countries, but


what it lacks in variety it more than makes up for in depth. Its premier series is TC2000, contested by 43 cars, entered by seven manufacturers and a wealth of privateers. There are few other race series that can boast this level of involvement, and there are two more manufacturers, Citroën and


Volkswagen, who are looking to join in one of the most successful multi-brand formulae in the world. The TC2000 championship has a huge following in Argentina and is rated as one of the top 10 Touring Car series in the world. It started in 1979, at the behest of Peugeot, Ford and Renault, who realised there was no production-based racing series in Argentina, yet there was a demand for just such. The fi rst ‘tournament’ was held


42 www.racecar-engineering.com • January 2012


in 1980, and won by Jorge del Rio in a Hillman Avenger, built by Chrysler in Argentina in the 1970s and later by Volkswagen. In the early days, the criteria


for who could enter were fairly clear. Any manufacturer that produced cars in Argentina would be eligible but, as the global market took over, that rule has relaxed slightly and now a manufacturer only has to produce a car in South America. That automatically eliminates BMW from the competition, but


Mercedes, for example, could enter as it builds the A class in Brazil, as well as trucks and buses in Argentina. By law, a percentage of the manufacturer’s income must also be spent on motorsport programmes. With General Motors, Peugeot-Citroën, FIAT, Ford, Honda, Renault, Toyota and Volkswagen all producing cars in the country itself, the potential for the TC2000 series is huge. Competing in 2011 were full factory teams from Ford,


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