This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
FEATURE


Turbulence Ahead for Helicopter Air Ambulance Operations? by Bill Winn - General Manager, NEMSPA


The sound of thunder on the near horizon


can herald hope or fear, depending on whether you are a drought-stricken farmer or a Golden Retriever with a serious phobia of both the boom and flash of lightening. My dog Max literally climbs into bed between me and Joyce during every thunderstorm, and lies there shivering uncontrollably until the storm has passed. It's like having one of those vibrating beds you find in cheap motels. As a member of the air medical transport


community, I know I speak for many when I say that the rumblings currently emanating from the


ROTORCRAFTPROFESSIONAL


FAA headquarters building at 800 Independence Avenue are a source of both hope and dread. I refer to the NPRM (Notice of Proposed Rule Making) currently under consideration that pur- ports to implement some of the most far reach- ing changes to FAR Part 135 in recent history. The proposed new rules are motivated by the disturbing trend in air medical helicopter acci- dents in recent years, and there is hope that the changes will be effective in improving the safety of patient transport operations. But, there is also acute concern that if the total impact of the rules is not very carefully considered before implemen-


36


Rumblings from Independence Avenue


tation, then some elements of the new rules may hinder air medical providers from delivering their life saving services without effectively targeting the most significant root causes of many air med- ical accidents. There is also a widespread senti- ment among EMS pilots that the NPRM has missed the mark with respect to selecting the most effective technology to use to mitigate the problem of accidents resulting from controlled flight into the terrain (CFIT). A summary of the proposed new rules and


revisions to existing regulations is contained in the following table, taken from the NPRM.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52