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from scratch and filled a hole in the helicopter market that has allowed helicopters to flourish where they otherwise would not be. He combined a keen engineering mind with well-honed test piloting skills and a fierce determination to turn his dream a reality, making him into a true Rotorcraft Pioneer. ◆


REFERENCES


Frank Robinson Biography. (n.d.). Robinson Helicopter Company Website. Retrieved January 18, 2011, from http://www.robinsonheli.com/rhc_frank_robinson.html


Robinson Helicopter Company Timeline. (n.d.). Robinson Helicopter Company Website. Retrieved January, 18, 2011, from http://www.robinsonheli.com/rhc_com- pany_history .html


the globe. Due to their low operating costs, Robinson hel- icopters are heavily used in several segments of the helicop- ter industry to include police work and news reporting. Unlike a young Frank Robinson in the early 1950s, many helicopter pilots have been able to afford flight training thanks to the R-22 and R-44. The introduction of the new R-66 will likely increase Robinson’s foothold in the small helicopter market and provide even more opportunities for helicopter usage where they did not previously exist. Frank Robinson’s legacy will no doubt be that he started one of the largest helicopter manufacturing companies in the world


LT Brad McNally is a 2001graduate of the United States Coast Guard Academy. After serving two tours in Coast Guard Naval Engineering he attended Naval Flight Training in Pensacola, Florida. He was previously station at the Coast Guard Air Station in Atlantic City, NJ


where he was an aircraft commander in the MH-65C Dolphin helicopter. He currently resides in


West Lafayette, IN with his wife Monica and son Brett where he is assigned as a graduate student at Purdue University pursuing a Masters Degree in Aeronautical Engineering.


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