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2010REVIEWED!


TOP PHILANTHROPIST! Thanks to the Wells Foundation… Barrie Wells is a successful fi nancial services entrepreneur who’s giving something back. The foundation, set up in 2009, aims to inspire young people at a grassroots level to get involved in sport, with numerous grants available. Barrie has rolled out a scheme aimed at boosting Britain’s chances of podium success at the 2012 London Olympics. www.wellssportsfoundation.org.


THINGS TO TRY IN 2011


Fine-tune your training and treat yourself to a running training day


A RUNNING FREE MARATHON TRAINING DAY with RF editor Fiona Bugler, and RF personal trainer Mike Ovens. The day will cover everything you need to know about your first marathon, from what to eat, what to wear, how to pace yourself, and ways to fine tune your schedule with core training and speed sessions. The course is to be held in Eastbourne on Saturday 5th February and costs £75 per person including free goodie bag, copy of Running Free magazine, and training booklet compiled by Fiona! Email fiona@runningfreemag.co.uk for more info.


A RUNNING WELL WORKSHOP WITH SAM MURPHY, (see Sam’s book Running Well, on page 6). Her workshops, Running Well and Mastering the Marathon, are to be held at Crystal Palace National Sports Centre in South London, on


Sunday 16th January and Sunday 6th


February 2011, respectively, and cost £55, including sessions on technique, running specific strength and core training, schedule advice, nutrition, flexibility and speed sessions. Email Sam at info@sam-murphy.co.uk.


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TOP RACING TIPS FROM OUR EDITOR, FIONA, A REGULAR RACER AND RUNNING COACH ■ The night before make sure you eat and drink well. Carb-loading can be saved for the marathon, but try to eat a well-balanced meal before you race and drink plenty of water. ■ Pack your bag and save rushing about in the morning. Sort out the clothes that you’re wearing to and from the race, attach your number to your top, and get your chip in your shoes ready to go! ■ Try a specially formulated night time drink for recovery and to aid sleep, like Nocté, £1 per 45g sachet, from SIS; or Night time Recovery Drink from Zipvitsport.com. ■ Wear the right shoes If you’re doing cross country in mud, wear spikes, for off-road races with slippery ups and downs, try trail shoes. If you’re a lightweight speedy runner, try racing shoes (see page 12 for an idea of what to buy). ■ Don’t overdress Coats around waists are okay when training, not so good for racing. Dress as if you’re going to work up a sweat! ■ Try out a positive mantra As simple as “I can do this!” will work. And visualise yourself crossing the line with a smile on your face. ■ Pace yourself Run too fast at the start and you’ll pay for it, whatever the distance. Wear a pace band (try www.marathonguide.com), and think yourself calm to slow you down at the start. ■ Wear blinkers! Okay, impossible, but try to race your own race. If you race a lot you can get distracted by the pace of runners you know, but remember you don’t know how they’re feeling or what training they’ve done up to the race. ■ Be realistic about what you can achieve Do interval sessions to gauge where you are. For example if you’ve got a goal 10k time why not try 5 or 6 x one mile with a minute recovery at your goal pace a week or so before the race. ■ Celebrate your successes, and learn from your bad days Smile, tell your friends, say thank you. On a bad day, think of it as a good experience and excellent training!


GEAR AND GOINGS ON


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