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Opposite: General Hamilton H. Howze


Right: Brigadier General Howze receiving his Army Aviator wings on 30 September, 1955. Howze became only the third Army general officer to wear wings. Pinning on the wings are Howze's West Point classmate Brigadier General Carl Hutton who was the Commandant of the Army Aviation School at Fort Rucker, AL. Photos: U.S. Army Aviation Museum


Mobility Requirements Board. However, because McNamara recom- mended that Howze lead the board, it has forever been known in the Army as the Howze Board. The board stood up in April of 1962 and was to have its report completed by the end of August. This short timeline forced the board to work quickly. The mem- bership grew to over 100 members representing all facets of the Army and the helicopter industry. The board investigated all avenues in forming its recommendations.


Everything from


logistics, supply and maintenance issues to potential weapons capabili- ties and battlefield simulations on paper and in the field was investigated. Largely based on Howze Board rec- ommendations, the Army went so far as to create a new division, the 11th Air Assault Division (Test), to test out the board’s findings.


Ultimately the


Howze board forever revolutionized mobile warfare concepts and shaped the formation of Army aviation as we know it today. The impact of the


Howze Board and the subsequent expansion of Army aviation have been likened to the replacement of horses with tanks in the 1930s and 1940s. Hamilton Howze was promoted to four star general in 1963. Howze’s final military assignment was in South Korea simultaneously as the Commander in Chief United Nations Command, Commander U.S. Forces Korea and Commanding General 8th Army. General Howze retired from the Army in 1965 and began a second career as the vice president for prod-


uct planning with Bell Helicopter. Howze worked for Bell in this capacity for five years during which time he kept an active qualification in the Bell Jet Ranger (Howze, 1996). Howze later left his post as vice-president to take a reduced role as a consultant for Bell. A charter member of the Army Aviation Association of America (the Quad A), Howze served for four years as its president.


Howze’s numerous


military awards include the Distinguished Service Medal, Silver Star, Legion of Merit and Bronze


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