This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Where Are All The Police? – An Analysis of Police Resources


offence and that other relevant conditions are met (e.g. that the amounts involved are under a given threshold). It could then be incumbent on the store to prosecute the offender privately or, for selected registered stores, to initiate court proceedings via the CPS. Essentially, the preparatory work would be passed back to the commercial organisation rather than borne by the police.


C. Commercial organisations take on a greater share of the costs associated with policing events and premises In addition to the suggestions above, further scrutiny should be given to the instances where commercial organisations should reimburse the police where the former’s profit-making activity has generated a need for policing (e.g. outside football grounds on match day). D. Clearly define the responsibility of public agencies Our research suggests that the boundaries between the police and other agencies need tighter definition. Consideration might be given to: • Hospitals being required to ensure that secure wards are actually ‘secured’ and carry the cost of apprehending any absconding patients


• Social Services to generate action plans to resolve repeat absconding by children and young people


• Local authorities carrying the cost of police attendance at environmental health incidents.


A renegotiation of responsibilities across the police and other public service providers will also require a reconsideration of the powers vested in different public agencies and the hours of cover that they provide. Other agencies should have explicit targets or Service Level Agreements in relation to the services they provide to the police, for example target times to provide an appropriate adult. E. Consider the scope for outsourcing certain functions These include some elements of missing persons enquiries, lost property, dealing with lost and injured dogs and other pets, and returning property used in criminal enquiries to owners. Specialist non- government organisations such as Shelter and the RSPCA could be invited to tender for the provision of relevant services. F. Better manage public expectations on the police • Any changes to the role of the police will require careful handling of public expectations. • In partnership with local authorities and other agencies an information campaign should aim to promote a better understanding of current police activity and open a debate on the future of the police role.


• The police should examine how current call handling processes can better screen out (perhaps by more direct links to other agencies or other telephone information sources) requests that are not really their responsibility.


• Consideration of how existing channels, such as UK-Online, or potentially new channels could head off unnecessary calls on the police in the first instance.


The words ‘initiative overload’ have become over-used. However, in the policing context there is a genuine issue here. At the very least there is a need to think through how best to communicate initiatives, what needs to be prioritised and how any reporting requirement can be kept to a minimum. In the words of one officer:


“Managerial priorities for operational policing are not being communicated effectively to front line officers who perceive themselves to be constantly fire-fighting or responding to the latest fad.”


Possible solutions Improve the status of operational policing Consideration should be given to: • Requiring all officers to return to operational policing from time-to-time rather than progressing from one specialist function to the next.


42


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com