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Where Are All The Police? – An Analysis of Police Resources Chapter 4 - Forces for the future


The structure of the police must allow them both to fight serious crime and develop community policing. Neither a national police force, regional forces or the status quo are viable models of policing for the future. Two models based on the current 43 forces are viable: locally accountable forces matched with effective leadership from the centre to ensure collaboration, or locally accountable forces operating alongside a national Serious Crime Force – which could allow the creation of smaller local forces in the future.


Chapter 5 - A professional workforce


If the police are to meet today’s challenges they will require a workforce that is flexible, highly skilled, well motivated, fairly paid and representative of the population it serves. Workforce reform, a new focus on training and leadership, easier entry for talented individuals, and greater flexibility for police managers will form a key part of the new police agenda.


Chapter 6 - Untying the police’s hands


The public want the police to be crime-fighters, not form-writers. Yet, in spite of repeated (Labour) Government promises to tackle excessive bureaucracy, police officers spend more time on paperwork than on patrol. This could be remedied by reducing paperwork, employing technology and modernising workforces to improve efficiency. Reducing central intervention and extending the police “family” will also help to free the police. “Summary justice” must not be an alternative to reducing police bureaucracy. Too often it is leading to soft justice.


Chapter 6 key findings THE POLICE SHOULD BE CRIME-FIGHTERS, NOT FORM-WRITERS


The public want the police to be crime-fighters, not form-writers. Yet police officers spend more time on paperwork than on patrol. Just 14 per cent of all police officers’ time is spent on patrol – a definition which “includes officers on foot/car/beat patrol, CID and traffic officers” – compared with 19.3 per cent of their time on paperwork. If the amount of time police officers spent on the beat could be increased from one fifth to two fifths, this would effectively double the police presence on the streets without recruiting a single additional officer.


PAPERWORK COULD BE REDUCED


Recording every stop takes seven minutes and is an unnecessary impediment both to police efficiency and their interaction with the public. The “stop and account” form should be scrapped – although a form for “stop and search” should be retained.


TECHNOLOGY COULD IMPROVE EFFICIENCY


One of the biggest barriers to police efficiency is that IT systems within the police are not joined up. This means that officers frequently have to key in the same details on multiple databases. The personal details


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