This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Where Are All The Police? – An Analysis of Police Resources


Figure 11 Combined percentage of Officers and PCSOs visibly available to the public in three smaller forces sampled


It is true of both the larger and smaller forces sampled that fewer police officers and PCSOs are available for work on Friday night than during the quiet period of Monday morning. In the larger forces, less than 7% of officers and PCSOs are available to the public on Friday night. Arguably, this may be a symptom of increased reliance over recent years on PCSOs to fill the frontline gap as PCSOs, typically, do not work after 8 o’clock in the evening. If so, this may serve as a good example of the limits of the current phase of ‘modernisation’.


In June 2010, HMIC contacted a Basic Command Unit (BCU), i.e. local area in each force to ask how many police officers were on response duties at a given time on a weekday morning. This information was then used to calculate the number of officers likely to be on response duties, at this time. From a total workforce in England and Wales of 143,835 officers, HMIC estimate that just over 5,000 officers (=3.5% of total workforce) are on response duties across the entire country on a typical weekday morning. There was significant variation across all forces: at worst, 1.2% of the total number of warranted officers were readily available for response; at best this was 8%.


The fact is that general availability, in which HMIC include neighbourhood policing and response, is relatively low. Several factors have combined to produce this ‘thin blue line’ of which shift patterns, risk management, bureaucracy and specialisation are the most significant.


Shift patterns


Whatever shift pattern is chosen, all police officers work the same number of contractual hours over the year. Most forces surveyed used 8-10 hour variable shift patterns – one used 12 hours widely. There was considerable variation in shift arrangements within a sample of six forces, which can be seen in analysis of officer days at work, per year (See Figure 12).


Officers in four of the six the forces had more days away than at work. Consequently, there can be a lack of continuity for the public, as it is harder for them to maintain contact with individual officers. Additionally, it can reduce operational flexibility and increase overtime costs.


27


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86
Produced with Yudu - www.yudu.com