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It is also important to remember that

from the top of the scapula to the point of shoulder to the elbow to the knee is all one apparatus. Nothing moves independently, so when he rotates the top of his scapula rearward, his point of shoulder rises, his elbow comes forward and his knees lift. In the photo of him jumping the vertical, he has not yet gone through the full range of motion of the forehand. Heaviness of the forehand is a

disadvantage to a jumper because it affects the amount of effort required as well as soundness. The pillar of support, represented by the dotted line that runs both upward and downward through the naturally occurring groove in the forearm, can be used as a guideline to give us objective criteria. One of the criteria for lightness is the

top of the line emerging in front of the withers. The further in front of the withers, the lighter the horse is on the forehand. Another criterion is where the pillar bisects the humerus. The closer to the elbow that the line bisects the humerus, the heavier the horse will be on the forehand. Bisecting the humerus at the midpoint is normal at the upper levels of this sport. If the bottom of this line emerges behind

the rear quarter of the hoof, the horse has additional stress on the suspensory apparatus of the foreleg. If it emerges into the front quarter of the hoof, there is additional concussion to the shock absorbing mechanisms. If, as in this case, it emerges into the rear quarter of the hoof, that is the most likely to provide soundness. Another factor for lightness of the forehand is the distance between the point of shoulder and the base of the neck. The more distance, the lighter the forehand. If Authentic’s pillar of support emerged slightly further in front of his withers and the base of his neck was slightly higher, he would likely not have developed the muscle on the underside of his neck.

WT

Coming next issue: Judy analyzes Salinero, Anky van Grunsven's world champion dressage mount.

About Judy: Having researched equine conformation for the last 30 years, Judy has written two books about the subject with two more on the agenda. She travels worldwide giving clinics about conformation for all disciplines. Her website is

www.jwequine.com.

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