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The International Andalusian and Lusitano Horse

Association encourages farm prefixes and suffixes and will register one such for exclusivity and uniqueness. Numerical suffixes (Arabic or Roman) must be approved by the registrar. Since duplicate names are not allowed, the registrar can assign a numerical suffix to prevent duplication. Names are limited to 25 characters.

Irish Draught Horse Society

of N.A. is open to any name. The same holds true for the Irish Sport Horse Association, however once the horse is named, the name cannot be changed. It’s not uncommon for horses in Ireland to be named after their county of birth, such as Ballinakill Glory. In the U.S. Irish Sport Horse names may link to their sire or the farm at which they were born or purchased, as for example Shamrock’s Emerald.

Horses that are

registered with the Dutch Warmblood organization,

KWPN North

America, are given names that start with the letter assigned to their year of birth, no longer than 20 characters. For 2009 the letter is “E”, and for 2010 the letter is “F”. A KWPN horse may have its name changed one

Top: “Do I Dazzle You” is a Hanoverian colt by Donarweiss GGF out of Whits End. His name must start

with “D” like his sire’s. Photo courtesy of Juliana Whittenburg and Flying Lion Farm.

24 September/October 2009

time, up to December 31 of the horse’s three year old year, providing it has no offspring on the ground. All stallion names must be unique. Here come the Lipizzans, which require much more concentration. Whether affiliated with the U.S. Lipizzan Registry or the

Lipizzan Association of North America,

here are the basic rules. Colts have two part names. The first represents the linage name of his sire. Of all the sires used in the 18th and 19th centuries,

six founded the original stallion lines of the breed: Siglavy, Neapolitano, Maestoso, Favory, Pluto,

and Conversano. Later in Croatia and Hungary,

the Tulipan and Incitato lines were developed. The second part of the Lipizzan colt’s name is his

dam’s name. You might end up, for example, with Pluto Rosabella. If there are more than one offspring of a cross, or a different stallion from the same stallion line is bred to the mare and the result is a duplicate name of two or more horses, you add a roman number, thus Pluto Rosabella II.

A Lipizzan filly is

given any name, but it must end in “a,” most often a form of the dam’s name. Other countries

in Europe and their breeding farms have individual

systems, and Lipizzans imported to the U.S. keep the names they are given in Europe. Horses from Piber, Austria, for example, have a number either in front

of the dam or sire name, such as 150

Bottom: Andalusian colt by Dante out of Plumon M8, named “JC Trumano.” JC is the prefix for the breeder, JC

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