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HANGAR TALK

Compliance With Rule Number One

By Mike Biasatti

might that have affected the outcome? I feel it can be valuable to ask ‘what if ,’ to attempt to piece together the possible links broken in the safety chain. Not, “what if they did ‘this’ or ‘that’ differently,” rather what if we were confronted with ‘this’ event or encountered ‘that’ situation. How would we address it? What are our options and alternatives? As has been proven in the past it is usually a series of events that, when allowed to occur in unchecked, have a catastrophic ending. If any one event were removed, then the results might have been much different.

One thing I have observed about myself is that it takes a great deal of energy for me to resist the urge to allow ego and pride not to play a part in decisions that I make.

When I look back at the tragedies our industry experienced in 2008, I mourn the loss of our colleagues, but I also try and look for clues. What can we learn about what happened that will help us operate more safely? As an active EMS heli- copter pilot working for a busy program, I spend time reviewing accident reports in hopes of gleaning some useful lessons to apply to our operations so that we will

be able to always comply with Opera- tional Rule Number One.

Rule Numbr One - Go Home At The End Of Your Shift

Not having been on any of the accident aircraft, no one can know exactly what happened or what sequence of events lead to the accident. Where might the crew have made a different choice and how

10 ROTORCRAFT PROFESSIONAL • August 2009

One thing I have observed about myself is that it takes a great deal of energy for me to resist the urge to allow ego and pride not to play a part in decisions that I make. Perhaps I may perform a less detailed walk-around inspection of the aircraft be- fore climbing in when I know it’s a scene call just 7 miles away, and dispatch let it slip that a child was involved who is the same age as my daughter, versus a hospital transfer 126 miles away to pick up a 96 year old DNR. That might be the time when I miss the tail rotor tiedowns in- stalled despite walking right past them. There seems to be a sense of tunnel vision that develops when adrenalin starts pump- ing and the urgency of what we do over- rides our innate sense of responsibility. I can always do better. After every flight I critique lift off to landing and I’ve never come away thinking that there was not some improvement that I could have made. I think that is a good starting point for discussion. Acknowledge mistakes to your crews when and if they occur. You’ll build substantially more credibility by ac- knowledging what you do not know and then finding the correct information ver- sus making something up. Open and hon- est dialogue with your crews builds trust Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52
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