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machinery feature | Melt filtration


Belt and the Twist Belt, Fabbri says that while with the former, there is an interruption in the flow when the screen is changed, there is no such interruption with the Twist Belt. As it is still at the prototype stage, he declines to provide further detail. The Gorilla Belt is available in various sizes, with


throughputs ranging from around 500 to 2,500 kg/h and above. Fabbri says that within the re-compound sector, production peaks of 4,000 kg/h can be reached, where fillers increase the material density. NGR of Austria also offers an automatic band melt


Cofit developed its Gorilla Belt for the recycling of highly contaminated materials


plastics) and discharge all the accumulated contamina- tion at once. According to Fimic’s representative in the USA, Sandy Guthrie at ADG Solutions, this system can cut the amount of resin wasted in the cleaning process by half or even two-thirds. Models range from 325 mm diameter up to the latest


700 mm version, enabling users to cover throughputs from around 250 kg/h to over 3,000 kg/h. Antonio Canaia, Fimic’s founder, says that the latest version can save operating costs, since it works at lower pressure, “which brings to a considerable power saving, as well as less wear on the extruder screw and barrel.” Recycling of highly contaminated materials is a key


The NGR Britas system is designed to handle high volumes of heavily


contaminated melt streams


driving force for screen-changer development, says another Italian supplier, Cofit. It claims that its Gorilla Belt, which debuted at K 2013, has gained significant acceptance in this market over the past year. Its launch has already been followed by the Twist Belt, a prototype of which was unveiled at the Plast 2015 exhibition in Milan this May. Alessandro Fabbri, Cofit president and sales director, says that the Twist Belt, which is aimed directly at the recycling market, has already caught the attention of a partner wanting to carry out industrial tests. Both the Twist Belt and the Gorilla Belt


enable uninterrupted production, in the sense that the extruder never stops. During the screen change, which takes around 22 seconds, melt is diverted into an accumulator cylinder. “The name Gorilla has been conceived to give the idea of strength,” Fabbri says. “It is equipped with two wedge blocks, like two big hands, to hold the screen, while a motor downstream displaces the screen by pulling it.” Explaining the difference between the Gorilla


58 COMPOUNDING WORLD | July 2015 www.compoundingworld.com


filter technology following its acquisition of Germany- based Britas in 2013. The Britas system is designed to handle high volumes of heavily contaminated melt streams, particularly polyethylene. It is said to provide effective cleaning of plastic melts to a fineness of 70 microns. Using cost-effective endless filter bands, the filtration area is completely renewed at each automatic screen-change. Melt spills are claimed to be less than 0.2%, further increasing production efficiency. According to NGR there are more than 170 Britas


filter systems operating at over 70 sites in Europe. It introduced the technology to the US market at this year’s NPE show in Orlando, Florida. The company also used this year’s Plast exhibition in Milan to display a Britas automatic band melt filter fitted with an updated control unit featuring flexible connectivity to data networks.


Recycling case studies Gneuss has also been focusing on developing equip- ment to handle highly contaminated materials such as in recycling processes. It says that its new RSFgenius M filtration system can cope with even higher contamina- tion rates than previous models, thanks to the synchro-


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