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additives feature | Antimicrobials and biocides Specimens tested


Test A Nano technology antibacterial Test B BA-950 Pellet 10%


100% Natural antimicrobial


Test C Benzisothiazolinone at 20% Test D Blank


Test E Silver base


4.69 2.53 3.59


100%


99.70% 99.97%


5.50 2.25 5.50


100%


99.43% 100%


2.03 0.35 2.03


99.06% 55.17% 99.06%


Test results based on JIS Z2801 for PE water tanks made by rotational moulding. First Quality Chemicals’ citrus-based additive is Test B. R is a value of antimicrobial activity; if R


≥ 2.0, the specimen is considered to present bactericidal properties. Growing applications in this region include com-


pounds for water tanks and filters, medical applica- tions, and food packaging. Compounders in Mexico and Latin America are selling in these regions and also exporting directly or indirectly to the US and other countries around the world, which is one of the reasons they are looking for alternatives, explains Arellano. “Up to now, I believe that some compounders haven’t operated in these markets because they haven’t found the right biocide solution, but this is beginning to change.” First Quality Chemicals recently introduced a


broad-spectrum antimicrobial based on a natural compound derived from citrus. For plastics compound- ing, the product is available as a powder in a silica carrier with 50% active ingredient, or as a 5 or 10% masterbatch in a range of polymer carriers. The product can be used as a broad-spectrum antiseptic, antibacterial, or antifungal. It also has antioxidant properties. The antimicrobial can resist temperatures up to 400°C. “It doesn’t affect the appearance of the final product, unlike other solutions which can cause spotting,” says Arellano. “Our products can be used in transparent applications, which have proven to be a difficult hurdle for the majority of biocides.” The citrus-based antimicrobial was tested in


rotomoulded polyethylene water tanks and found to have better results than competing antimicrobials (see table). The product is being used in Mexico and Latin America and is being tested in the USA, where it is qualified as a minimum-risk pesticide (under the criteria for FIFRA 25(b) exemption).


Processing antimicrobials Antimicrobial additives are widely used by moulders as masterbatches, says Microban’s Ong, which is benefi- cial because some antimicrobials have safety concerns when handling the powdered additive. Isothiazalones, for example, can be sensitizers. In addition, it is easier for plastic processors to achieve accurate, low dosage


46 COMPOUNDING WORLD | July 2015


levels using a masterbatch. “Compounders must be careful not to deteriorate the antimicrobial during processing, with careful attention to temperature and equipment parameters,” says Ong.


More information Ivan Ong, vice-president of research and development at Microban, will discuss developments in antimicrobial additives at our forthcoming Compounding World Asia conference in Singapore and at the Compounding World Forum in the USA. His presentations will include guidance on additive selection, recent case studies and provide a regulatory update. The Compounding World Asia conference takes place in Singapore on 6-8 October 2015. The full line-up of speakers and booking details can be found at http://bit.ly/CWAsia15. Book before 4 September to save US$130.


The Compounding World Forum returns to Philadel-


phia, PA, USA on 8-9 December 2015. The conference brochure with the complete programme has just been published at http://bit.ly/CWF15P.


Click on the links for more information: ❙ www.americhem.comwww.Biosafe.com (Gelest) ❙ www.compoundingsolutions.netwww.firstqualitychemicals.comwww.heiq.comwww.janssenpmp.comwww.lawbc.com (Bergeson & Campbell) ❙ www.life-materials.comwww.microban.comwww.parxplastics.comwww.pasreform.comwww.polyone.comwww.rasmaterials.comwww.qtekllc.comwww.sciessent.comwww.sealshield.com


www.compoundingworld.com


Staphylococcus aureus (CECT240, A TCC 6538P)


R


3.13 4.69


Effectiveness 99.93% 100%


Escherichia coli


(CECT 516, A TCC8739) R


5.67 5.67


Effectiveness 100% 100%


Aspergillus niger


(CECT2807, A TCC 6275) R


2.03 2.03


Effectiveness 99.06% 99.06%


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