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Lego invests in search for sustainable materials


The Lego Group is establishing a Sustainable Materials Centre and expects to recruit more than 100 employees within the materials field to find and implement sustainable alternatives to its current materials mix by 2030. It plans to spend nearly €135 million on R&D into sustainable raw materials for both its products and their packaging materials. “This is a major step on our


way towards achieving our 2030 ambition on sustainable materials,” said company CEO and president Jørgen Vig Knudstorp. “We have already taken important steps to reduce our carbon footprint and leave a positive impact on the planet by reducing the packaging size, by introducing FSC-certified packaging and through our investment in an offshore wind farm. Now we are accelerating our focus on materials.” The Sustainable Materials


Centre will be established this year at Lego’s headquarters in Billund, Denmark, but will


Lego is investing heavily to find sustainable materials for its bricks and their packaging


The VDMA confirms forecasts


The VDMA, Germany’s plastics and rubber machinery manufacturers’ trade association, has confirmed that it expects sales to rise by 4% in real terms this year and 2% next year, taking the total value of its products to over €7 billion for the first time. In 2014, output by VDMA


ultimately include satellite functions in other locations. It will also collaborate and develop partnerships with relevant external stakeholders and experts. Lego originally announced


plans to find sustainable alternatives to current raw materials in 2012 and made the decision to boost such activity at its general assembly in May. This is all part of a move towards reducing its environ- mental footprint. However, the company stressed that any new materials will not compromise its quality or safety standards and it will “continue to seek extensive research and robust


data to ensure that all aspects of safety and quality are considered”. Knudstorp agreed that


there is “no common definition of a sustainable material. Several factors influence the environmental sustainability of a material – the composition of the material, how it is sourced and what happens when the product reaches the end of its life. When we search for new materials all of these factors must be considered,” he said. Lego currently produces


more than 60 million bricks per year and the vast majority are moulded in ABS. ❙ www.lego.com


members had been 1.6% down. “Business in Europe made up for declines in other sales regions,” noted Thorsten Kühmann, the association’s managing director. Germany itself saw a sharp increase after years on a downward trajectory, accounting for an 18% increase in the order intake. This year, the industry’s


two most important markets, China and the US, are expected to recover to moderate growth. Eastern Europe should remain buoyant, though Russia will see a further decline. ❙ http://plastics.vdma.org


Schulman appoints R&D director for Asia


A. Schulman has appointed Tony Daponte as its first R&D director for masterbatch in the Asia-Pacific region. Daponte has been with the


company in a similar role in the Europe, Middle East & Africa since 2001 and has also managed it facility in Bornem, Belgium, since 2012. His new role will involve collaborating with the existing application


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centres in the region and assisting in the development of a R&D facility dedicated to harnessing technical know- how in the Asia-Pacific. ❙ www.aschulman.com


Tony Daponte becomes A. Schulman’s first R&D


director for masterbatch in the Asia-Pacific region


COMPOUNDING WORLD | July 2015 www.compoundingworld.com


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