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Domo Chemicals acquires Technical Polymers


German PA6 and intermedi- ates producer Domo Chemi- cals has bought US-based engineering plastics specialist Technical Polymers for an undisclosed amount. Technical Polymers, which is based in Buford in Georgia, specialises in the develop- ment, production and market- ing of high performance engineering polymers, which it supplies to customers in the US automotive, agricultural, Oil & Gas, E&E and sports and leisure sectors. It generated sales last year of around US$35 million. According to Domo


Chemicals, Technical Polymers brings it broad expertise in engineering thermoplastic compound formulation and


FDM moves to larger facility


FDM, a German-based subsidiary of the Piovan Group, is to move from its current site at Königswinter to a new production facility in Troisdorf. This will have a doubled production space of 1,900 m2


. FDM produces feeding


systems for pellets, recycled materials and powder, gravimetric dosing systems and complete material handling systems for PVC treatment, recycling and compounds. ❙ http://fdm.piovan.com/en


www.compoundingworld.com


Sun Chemical expands capacity for metallic effect pigments


DIC subsidiary Sun Chemical is to spend over US$10 million by the end of 2016 to expand capacity for its Benda-Lutz brand of metallic effect pigments by more than 40%. These are produced at sites in the US, Austria, Poland, Russia and China in the form of


powders, pastes, vacuum- metallised pigments and preparations. “Both decorative and functional metallic effects continue to be strategic product lines for Sun Chemi- cal,” said Myron Petruch, president of Sun Chemical


Performance Pigments. “In the past several years, we have seen tremendous growth of our Benda-Lutz brand in a wide range of applications. We are optimistic that this upward trend will continue and are planning for future growth.” ❙ www.sunchemical.com


July 2015 | COMPOUNDING WORLD 5


development, as well as detailed understanding of plastic part design, tooling and processing. The company said the move, together with Domo’s recently announced investment in a 20,000 tonnes/ year polyamide compounding plant in China, is designed to strengthen its global position. “Gary Foote and Ron Kay,


co-founders of Technical Polymers, have built a unique business with a diverse portfolio of nylon products and a range of high performance polymers,” said Domo Chemicals CEO Alex Segers. “This acquisition, integrating a great team of people, perfectly fits into our strategy to grow our innovative capabilities and globally strengthen the


business and service level to our customers.” Domo Chemicals, which


generated sales of around US$1 billion in 2014, an- nounced its Chinese com- pounding investment in May. The company said the initial 20,000 tonnes/year production line will be joined by a second line that will be fully opera- tional before the end of 2015. The facility, part of the Domo Engineering Plastics manufac- turing network, will supply Asian customers with a range of products, including Doma- mid PA6 and 66 and high temperature (HTN) grades, and Economid and Economid Oro recycled PA 6 and 66 grades. ❙ www.domochemicals.comwww.techpolymers.com


Aerospace group lists substances


The International Aero- space Environmental Group has launched an Aerospace & Defence Declarable Substances List. The list comprises 800


chemicals, some of them REACH-restricted flame retardants, within three groups: prohibited/ identified for prohibition; disclosure required by regulation; and, likely to be subject to requirements in the future. Brominated dipheyl ethers, notably deca, SCCPs and HBCD are in the first group. The second includes trixylyl phosphate and the third features antimony com- pounds. ❙ www.iaeg.com


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