This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Early Woly products and packaging


Evolving to meet changing needs True to Mr. Sutter’s original innovative spirit,


the Woly brand continued to evolve over the next few decades with the traditional product changing in two main ways.


Firstly, the product diversified from exclusively


leather care to include a wider range of footwear. As synthetic materials and sports shoes arrived on the market, effective footwear maintenance required a different approach.


Woly adapted to these changes with ranges


that also help to destroy the bacteria that cause odours. In effect, they kept shoes clean on the inside as well as the outside.


The second change related to product


application. Although the traditional glass jar has always been a popular part of the range, new ways to apply the different products have been developed over time. From sponge application to sprays, Woly have continually reviewed and developed increasingly efficient ways of cleaning, conditioning, polishing, waterproofing and colour refreshing people’s footwear.


Shoestring Ltd is the sole UK distributor of Woly products and supplies the complete range to independent retailers and larger shoe chains across Britain.


New Woly products


For more information, visit www.shoestringuk.co.uk


APRIL 2014 • FOOTWEAR TODAY • 23


An international operation Having grown into an international company,


factory production moved from Switzerland to Germany in 1991. From its origins in the 1860s through to the present day, the company has always prided itself on the quality of its products. That commitment to quality has paid off, as Woly is now operating at the top end of the market in over 40 countries - and counting. The company may be unrecognisable from its early days, but the focus on creating the highest quality shoecare product on the market has never changed.


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60