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With new transitional housing, Life After Innocence continues its work to reintegrate the exonerated into the world outside prison. By GAIL MANSFIELD


hen wrongly convicted people are freed from prison, their journey has just begun. Exonerees—people exonerated of crimes for which they were convicted— have lost years of time with family, earning power,


and every other opportunity. They’ve been through the signifi- cant emotional and mental trauma of incarcerated life. They are frequently short on money with no place to live, no ID or access to medical care, little ability to use current technology, and only the clothes they’re wearing. Contrary to a general belief that those wrongfully convicted


regularly receive remuneration, many receive no financial judg- ment, according to Laura Caldwell (JD ’92), founder and director of Loyola’s Life After Innocence project. Life After Innocence offers guidance, pro bono legal services, and additional support to exonerees. Students and professors involved with the project help exonerees expunge their records, find housing, search for employ- ment, obtain counseling, obtain computer and cell phone skills, and much more. “I tell my students that small actions make big changes,” Caldwell says, “especially in the lives of people starting over from scratch.”


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